Archive | September, 2015

FSFlow – A Social Engineering Call Flow Application

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


FSFlow is a Social Engineering Call Flow Application, which was created to improve and standardize social engineering calls. It’s a difficult thing to do, conversations can go almost anywhere over the span of a phone call which makes defining a specific process hard, if not impossible.

FSFlow is mostly a proof of concept tool but it’s fully functional, it’s an interesting tool and an area which not many people have thought about or looked into. Social Engineering is part science and part art (charisma and charm helps a lot), so a tool like this helps a lot especially in creating repeatable social engineering tests.

FSFlow - A Social Engineering Call Flow Application

It’s based on the concept of the call flow software that is involved in most telemarketer jobs. Nearly everything that they say is presented to them on a screen in front of them, and they would navigate through a process flow as the call progressed.

Judging User Response

One of the major pains with designing an application like this is judging the response of a user. You can never predict the user’s exact response so the measure of the response needs to be somewhat abstracted. The approach here is to identify if the user’s response is positive or negative. For instance, if you say “Hi, How are you?” and they say “Great!” – that’s a clearly positive response, while “What do you want.” is a bit more negative. Similarly, if you ask someone “What is your password?” and they provide it to you, that would be positive, while anything else is likely to be negative.

The difficult thing here is that many user responses aren’t easily categorized as negative or positive; perhaps a sliding scale would be more appropriate – but that would create tons of possible branches, making a complete call flow impractical.

Logging

Another hugely important part of FSFlow is to capture how the call progressed. The call log records how the call progresses and what information is obtained at what points in the call flow. You could potentially use this information to determine where users need more security awareness training – e.g. every user was willing to disclose their IP address, but only some gave their password or even when asking this specific question, users got suspicious and ended the call.

The Interface

FSFlow’s interface is meant to be as simple and straightforward as possible so that the caller is not overwhelmed or distracted during the call.

The first release resulted in 4 major areas: the statement pane, response pane, objectives and call variables:

  • Statement Pane – The statement pane is the actual wording the caller says during the call. This is your social engineering attack. The important thing about this pane is that the wording is clear and easy to read aloud. You’ll notice in the screenshot above that there are placeholders, e.g. “[TARGETNAME]”, this are call specific variables that are populated once you populate the Call Variables pane (described below).
  • Response Pane – Directly under the statement pane is the response pane compromised of the “Negative Response”, “Positive Response”, Busted” and “Recovery Mode” buttons. Each of these buttons progress the call to the next flow state. The “Recovery Mode” button is meant to gently direct the call to an end without aggravating the callee. The “Busted” button is more of an “Ok, you got me” response where you let the callee know that this is a social engineering call, they should contact the point of contact for the company (the person that hired the caller), and to please not tell the coworkers of the test :)
  • Objectives – The Objectives pane is where the caller can log what elements of information they’re able to obtain during the call.
  • Call Variables – Call Variables customize the flow to each individual call. Before the call starts, the caller populates these variables so that the placeholders in the statement pane are replaced with pertinent information. It also serves as a reminder to the caller to who they are pretending to be!

The Call Flow

Thee most important component of FSFlow is its XML based call flows. The idea behind the call flow is that they could be easily shared to be improved and make standardized attacks. Let’s look at sample.xml that’s included with the application.


The entire call flow is included within a block which takes one attribute, name. Within the CallFlow block, you have Objective, CallBlock, and FlowBlocks.

Objectives

Defining objectives is pretty straightforward:

CallBlocks

A CallBlock is effectively a container for an individual statement. These statements are then linked together within the FlowBlock below. Place holders can be anything you’d like, as long as they’re wrapped in brackets. FSFlow analyzes the flow on start up to populate the “Call Variables” pane.

The “Busted” Call block is a static value used throughout the call:

FlowBlocks

The FlowBlock links together individual CallBlock and ties them to buttons.

You can download FSFlow here:

fsflow-0.1.2.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Social Engineering

Topic: Social Engineering


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EvilFOCA – Network Attack Toolkit

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Evil Foca is a network attack toolkit for penetration testing professionals and security auditors whose purpose it is to test security in IPv4 and IPv6 data networks.

EvilFOCA - Network Attack Toolkit

The software automatically scans the networks and identifies all devices and their respective network interfaces, specifying their IPv4 and IPv6 addresses as well as the physical addresses through a convenient and intuitive interface.

Features

The tool is capable of carrying out various attacks such as:

  • MITM over IPv4 networks with ARP Spoofing and DHCP ACK Injection.
  • MITM on IPv6 networks with Neighbor Advertisement Spoofing, SLAAC attack, fake DHCPv6.
  • DoS (Denial of Service) on IPv4 networks with ARP Spoofing.
  • DoS (Denial of Service) on IPv6 networks with SLAAC DoS.
  • DNS Hijacking.

Each is explained more in depth in the following section.


Man In The Middle (MITM) Techniques

The well-known “Man In The Middle” is an attack in which the wrongdoer creates the possibility of reading, adding, or modifying information that is located in a channel between two terminals with neither of these noticing. Within the MITM attacks in IPv4 and IPv6 Evil Foca considers the following techniques:

  • ARP Spoofing: Consists in sending ARP messages to the Ethernet network. Normally the objective is to associate the MAC address of the attacker with the IP of another device. Any traffic directed to the IP address of the predetermined link gate will be erroneously sent to the attacker instead of its real destination.
  • DHCP ACK Injection: Consists in an attacker monitoring the DHCP exchanges and, at some point during the communication, sending a packet to modify its behavior. Evil Foca converts the machine in a fake DHCP server on the network.
  • Neighbor Advertisement Spoofing: The principle of this attack is identical to that of ARP Spoofing, with the difference being in that IPv6 doesn’t work with the ARP protocol, but that all information is sent through ICMPv6 packets. There are five types of ICMPv6 packets used in the discovery protocol and Evil Foca generates this type of packets, placing itself between the gateway and victim.
  • SLAAC attack: The objective of this type of attack is to be able to execute an MITM when a user connects to Internet and to a server that does not include support for IPv6 and to which it is therefore necessary to connect using IPv4. This attack is possible due to the fact that Evil Foca undertakes domain name resolution once it is in the communication media, and is capable of transforming IPv4 addresses in IPv6.
  • Fake DHCPv6 server: This attack involves the attacker posing as the DCHPv6 server, responding to all network requests, distributing IPv6 addresses and a false DNS to manipulate the user destination or deny the service.
  • Denial of Service (DoS) attack: The DoS attack is an attack to a system of machines or network that results in a service or resource being inaccessible for its users. Normally it provokes the loss of network connectivity due to consumption of the bandwidth of the victim’s network, or overloads the computing resources of the victim’s system.
  • DoS attack in IPv4 with ARP Spoofing: This type of DoS attack consists in associating a nonexistent MAC address in a victim’s ARP table. This results in rendering the machine whose ARP table has been modified incapable of connecting to the IP address associated to the nonexistent MAC.
  • DoS attack in IPv6 with SLAAC attack: In this type of attack a large quantity of “router advertisement” packets are generated, destined to one or several machines, announcing false routers and assigning a different IPv6 address and link gate for each router, collapsing the system and making machines unresponsive.
  • DNS Hijacking: The DNS Hijacking attack or DNS kidnapping consists in altering the resolution of the domain names system (DNS). This can be achieved using malware that invalidates the configuration of a TCP/IP machine so that it points to a pirate DNS server under the attacker’s control, or by way of an MITM attack, with the attacker being the party who receives the DNS requests, and responding himself or herself to a specific DNS request to direct the victim toward a specific destination selected by the attacker.

You can download EvilFOCA 0.1.4.0 here:

EvilFoca.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Networking Hacking

Topic: Hacking Tools, Networking Hacking


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XcodeGhost iOS Trojan Infected Over 4000 Apps

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


So the recent XcodeGhost iOS Trojan Infection has escalated quickly, an initial estimate of 39 infected apps has rapidly increased to over 4000!

XcodeGhost iOS Infection Over 4000 Apps

You can see the FireEye announcement here: Protecting Our Customers from XcodeGhost

XCodeGhost is the first instance of the iOS App Store distributing a large number of trojanized apps, the malicious/infected apps steal device and user information and send stolen data to a command and control (CnC) server

The number of XCodeGhost-infected iOS apps, initially pegged at 39, has ballooned to more than 4,000.

The staggering increase was the handiwork of analysis by FireEye researchers who said that the apps were being hosted on the official Apple App Store.

“Immediately after learning of XcodeGhost, FireEye Labs identified more than 4,000 infected apps on the App Store,” FireEye said.

The malicious apps steal device and user information and send stolen data to a command and control (CnC) server [and] also accept remote commands including the ability to open URLs sent by the CnC server.

These URLs can be phishing webpages for stealing credentials, or a link to an enterprise-signed malicious app that can be installed on non-jailbroken devices.

A FireEye spokesman told Vulture South that many of the infected apps were owned by “big Chinese global brands” such as consumer electronics, telcos, and banks.

The Register has asked FireEye for the names of some of the prominent affected apps and will update this story should the information come to hand.

FireEye put the huge increase in the number of discovered apps to fast scanning by its mobile threat prevention platform.


It seems to be heavily linked to China, with the original XcodeGhost author also being Chinese, you can see the code repo here: XcodeGhost

A translation using Google sees the author apologise and say he wrote this as a personal experiment and the original only collects non-personal data like device type, iOS version, language, country, device name and so on.

Apple has continued to exorcise the App Store of malicious apps uploaded in what has been widely considered to be Cupertino’s first big malware attack.

The apps were infected after developers downloaded a copy of the Xcode iOS development tool through a file-sharing service. That package was modified to trojanise apps in a way that passed App Store security checks, and was advertised on popular developer forums as a faster source to download the 3Gb Xcode file.

The success of the XCodeGhost phish is staggering; that some 4,000 apps were hosed indicates that a lot of developers were sucked into what must have been a very well-executed attack by highly capable malefactors.

Veracode principal solutions architect John Smith said that the attack challenged the notion that iOS was safer than Android.

“In recent years it has seemed that the problem of mobile malware was bigger for Android than for iOS,” Smith said.

“The more rigorous testing regime required before an iOS app can be published has always been considered to be the reason for this difference, but in this case it seems to have fallen short.”

From an infection graph, it seems like it’s been going on for a while, since April 2015 at least – but there’s been a huge peak in infected apps in September.

It’s surprising that such a large number of apps were able to violate Apple’s stringent App Store policies for such an extended period of time.

Even then, it seems like the implementation of XcodeGhost isn’t that malicious and they aren’t sending much more than the original author intended.

Source: The Register

Posted in: Apple, Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Malware

Topic: Apple, Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Malware


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peinjector – MITM PE File Injector

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The peinjector is a MITM PE file injector, the tool provides different ways to infect Windows platform executable files (PE COFF) with custom payloads without changing the original functionality. It creates patches, which are then applied seamlessly during file transfer. It is very performant, lightweight, modular and can be operated on embedded hardware.

peinjector - MITM PE File Injector

Features

  • Full x86 and x64 PE file support.
  • Open Source
  • Fully working on Windows and Linux, including automated installation scripts.
  • Can be operated on embedded hardware, tested on a Raspberry Pi 2.
  • On Linux, all servers will be automatically integrated as service, no manual configuration required.
  • Plain C, no external libraries required (peinjector).
  • MITM integration is available in C, Python and Java. A sample Python MITM implementation is included.
  • Foolproof, mobile-ready web interface. Anyone who can configure a home router can configure the injector server.
  • Easy to use integrated shellcode factory, including reverse shells, or meterpreter.

How it Works


peinjector contains the following:

  • libpefile – Provides PE file parsing, modification and reassembling capabilities, based on PE COFF specification. Also works with many non-compliant and deliberately malformed files which the Windows Loader accepts.
  • libpetool – Provides more complex modifications (adding/resizing sections). Keeps header values PE COFF compliant.
  • libpeinfect – Provides different infection methods, removes integrity checks, certificates, etc. It can fully infect a file (statically, e.g. from disk) or generate a patch (for MITM infection. Connectors which work with these patches are available in C, Python and Java). The infected file keeps its original functionality.

Servers

  • peinjector – Provides PE file patching as a service. Just send the raw header of your PE file and you’ll receive a custom-made patch for it. Can be remotely controlled via a command protocol.
  • peinjector-control – Web interface to configure and control a peinjector server. A small shellcode factory with some basic shellcodes, automatic encryptoin/obfuscation and thread generation is provided – alternatively, custom shellcode can be injected.
  • peinjector-interceptor – Sample MITM integration. Based on Python and libmproxy, supports SSL interception, can act as transparent Proxy, HTTP Proxy, … . Provides seamless PE patching capabilities.

You can download peinjector here:

peinjector-1.0.1.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Secure Coding, Windows Hacking

Topic: Hacking Tools, Secure Coding, Windows Hacking


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Weevely 3 – Weaponized PHP Web Shell

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Weevely is a command line weaponized PHP web shell dynamically extended over the network at runtime and is designed for remote administration and pen testing. It provides a telnet-like console through a PHP script running on the target, even in restricted environments.

The low footprint agent and over 30 modules shape an extensible framework to administrate, conduct a pen-test, post-exploit, and audit remote web accesses in order to escalate privileges and pivot deeper in the internal networks.

Weevely 3 - Weaponized PHP Web Shell

The remote agent is a very low footprint PHP script that receives dynamically injected code from the client, extending the client functionalities over the network at run-time. The agent code is polymorphic and hardly detectable by AV and HIDS. The communication is covered and obfuscated within the HTTP protocol using steganographic techniques.

We did mention Weevely a couple of years back at v1.0: Weevely – PHP Stealth Tiny Web Shell

Module Features

  • Shell/PHP telnet-like network terminal
  • Common server misconfigurations auditing
  • SQL console pivoting on target
  • HTTP traffic proxying through target
  • Mount target file system to local mount point
  • Conduct network scans pivoting on target
  • File upload and download
  • Spawn reverse and direct TCP shells
  • Bruteforce services accounts
  • Compress and decompress zip, gzip, bzip2 and tar archives

What’s New

  • Basic Windows support
  • OS X Support
  • Python requirements.txt
  • Encoding support for sql_console
  • Output redirection and inverse grep for file_grep
  • Run actions on start depending from the session load
  • Proxy and SOCKS support
  • Unset session variables
  • Show session variables

Weevely also provides python API which can be used to develop your own module to implement internal audit, account enumerator, sensitive data scraper, network scanner, make the modules work as a HTTP or SQL client and do a whole lot of other cool stuff.

You can download Weevely here:

Weevely-v3.2.0.zip

Or read more here.

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Kid Arrested For Clock He Built – World Goes NUTS

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


So, today we have a tale of the fabled American knee-jerk reaction, kid arrested for clock he built – this time to a 14-year-old Muslim boy who made a cool clock and brought it to school. He got arrested, cuffed and fingerprinted – over a science project. Yah, arrested for building a clock.

That seems like a slightly harsh reaction, perhaps because his name is Ahmed? Or he’s Muslim? Or 9/11 was just a few days ago? Or all of the factors combined, and the fact his clock bleeped in class.

Kid Arrested For Clock He Built - World Goes NUTS

The coolest part? He was arrested wearing a NASA t-shirt.

Texas police have decided not to charge a 14-year-old Muslim boy who was arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school.

Officials at MacArthur High School in Irving alerted police because they thought the device was a “hoax bomb”.

Ahmed Mohamed’s arrest has been sharply criticised, and the boy has received an outpouring of support including an invitation to the White House.

Ahmed’s family believes he was detained because of his name.

“We have always had an outstanding relationship with the Muslim community,” Irving Police Department chief Larry Boyd said on Wednesday. “Incidents like this present challenges. We want to learn how we can move forward and turn this into a positive.”

The boy was placed in handcuffs and fingerprinted. He was released after it was determined there was no threat.


Zuck posted his support for Ahmed too.

Kid Arrested for Clock he Built – Mark Zuckerberg Responds

You’ve probably seen the story about Ahmed, the 14 year old student in Texas who built a clock and was arrested when he…

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Zuck’s Thoughts.

You can see the stream of support for the kid, and the rallying against the cause with the Twitter hashtag #IStandWithAhmed

It’s turned into quite something with POTUS, Hilary Clinton, the US Secretary of Education and many many more getting involved.

Under the hashtag “#IstandwithAhmed,” thousands of Twitter users praised the boy’s initiative and questioned why he was detained including Nasa scientists and US President Barack Obama.

“Cool clock, Ahmed. Want to bring it to the White House? We should inspire more kids like you to like science. It’s what makes America great,” Mr Obama wrote on Twitter.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations says it is investigating the incident.

Ahmed said that he had made a clock at home and brought it to school to show his engineering teacher. He said his engineering teacher had congratulated him but advised him “not to show any other teachers”.

Check out the Tweet from POTUS, he’s not impressed with the kid arrested for clock scenario.

There’s a good in-depth article by CNN here as well: Muslim teen Ahmed Mohamed creates clock, shows teachers, gets arrested

It’s all getting very intense.

Source: BBC

Posted in: Hacking News, Hardware Hacking

Topic: Hacking News, Hardware Hacking


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