SecurityCompass Exploit-Me – Firefox Web Application Testing Tools

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Exploit-Me is a suite of Firefox web application security testing tools. Exploit-Me tools are designed to be lightweight and easy to use. Instead of using a proxy like many web application testing tools, Exploit-Me integrates directly with Firefox. It currently consists of two tools, one for XSS and one for SQL Injection.

The Exploit-Me series was originally introduced at the SecTor conference in Toronto. The slides for the presentation are available for download [PDF].

Currently in their beta release stage, these open source (GPL v3) FireFox plug-ins search through web applications for vulnerable visible and hidden form fields to perform input validation attacks.

XSS-Me

XSS-Me is the Exploit-Me tool used to test for reflected Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). It does NOT currently test for stored XSS.

The tool works by submitting your HTML forms and substituting the form value with strings that are representative of an XSS attack.

If the resulting HTML page sets a specific JavaScript value (document.vulnerable=true) then the tool marks the page as vulnerable to the given XSS string.

The tool does not attempting to compromise the security of the given system. It looks for possible entry points for an attack against the system. There is no port scanning, packet sniffing, password hacking or firewall attacks done by the tool.

SQL Inject-Me

SQL Inject Me is the Exploit-Me tool used to test for SQL Injection vulnerabilities.

The tool work by submitting your HTML forms and substituting the form value with strings that are representative of an SQL Injection attack.

The tool works by sending database escape strings through the form fields. It then looks for database error messages that are output into the rendered HTML of the page.

The tool does not attempting to compromise the security of the given system. It looks for possible entry points for an attack against the system. There is no port scanning, packet sniffing, password hacking or firewall attacks done by the tool.

You can get XSS-Me and SQL Inject-Me here:

Download XSS-Me Now!
Download SQL Inject-Me Now!

Or read more here.

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Web Hacking

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One Response to SecurityCompass Exploit-Me – Firefox Web Application Testing Tools

  1. James C March 27, 2008 at 7:46 pm #

    Found these to be of limited use.
    I’d give these “tools” a 4 out of 10.