Darknet - The Darkside

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17 November 2015 | 3,398 views

KeeFarce – Extract KeePass Passwords (2.x) From Database

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!

KeeFarce allows you to extract KeePass passwords (2.x) by using DLL injection to execute code and retrieve the database information from memory. The cleartext information, including usernames, passwords, notes and url’s are dumped into a CSV file in %AppData%.

KeeFarce - Extract KeePass 2.x Passwords From Database

KeeFarce uses DLL injection to execute code within the context of a running KeePass process. C# code execution is achieved by first injecting an architecture-appropriate bootstrap DLL. This spawns an instance of the dot net runtime within the appropriate app domain, subsequently executing KeeFarceDLL.dll (the main C# payload).

The KeeFarceDLL uses CLRMD to find the necessary object in the KeePass processes heap, locates the pointers to some required sub-objects (using offsets), and uses reflection to call an export method.

Executing

In order to execute on the target host, the following files need to be in the same folder:

  • BootstrapDLL.dll
  • KeeFarce.exe
  • KeeFarceDLL.dll
  • Microsoft.Diagnostic.Runtime.dll

Copy these files across to the target and execute KeeFarce.exe

You can download KeeFarce here (which contains prebuilt 32-bit and 64-bit executables):

KeeFarce-master.zip (Your AV may flag this malicious)

Or read more here.

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13 November 2015 | 2,769 views

ModSecurity – Open Source Web Application Firewall

ModSecurity is an open source web application firewall (WAF) module that is cross platform capable. Known as the “Swiss Army Knife” of WAFs, it enables web application defenders to gain visibility into HTTP(S) traffic and provides a power rules language and API to implement advanced protections.

ModSecurity - Open Source Web Application Firewall

ModSecurity is a toolkit for real-time web application monitoring, logging, and access control. It’s an enabler: there are no hard rules telling you what to do; instead, it is up to you to choose your own path through the available features.

The freedom to choose what to do is an essential part of ModSecurity’s identity and goes very well with its open source nature. With full access to the source code, your freedom to choose extends to the ability to customize and extend the tool itself to make it fit your needs. It’s not a matter of ideology, but of practicality.

Features

  • Real-time application security monitoring and access control
    At its core, ModSecurity gives you access to the HTTP traffic stream, in real-time, along with the ability to inspect it. This is enough for real-time security monitoring. There’s an added dimension of what’s possible through ModSecurity’s persistent storage mechanism, which enables you to track system elements over time and perform event correlation. You are able to reliably block, if you so wish, because ModSecurity uses full request and response buffering.
  • Virtual patching
    Virtual patching is a concept of vulnerability mitigation in a separate layer, where you get to fix problems in applications without having to touch the applications themselves. Virtual patching is applicable to applications that use any communication protocol, but it is particularly useful with HTTP, because the traffic can generally be well understood by an intermediary device. ModSecurity excels at virtual patching because of its reliable blocking capabilities and the flexible rule language that can be adapted to any need. It is, by far, the activity that requires the least investment, is the easiest activity to perform, and the one that most organizations can benefit from straight away.
  • Full HTTP traffic logging
    Web servers traditionally do very little when it comes to logging for security purposes. They log very little by default, and even with a lot of tweaking you are not able to get everything that you need. I have yet to encounter a web server that is able to log full transaction data. ModSecurity gives you that ability to log anything you need, including raw transaction data, which is essential for forensics. In addition, you get to choose which transactions are logged, which parts of a transaction are logged, and which parts are sanitized.
  • Continuous passive security assessment
    Security assessment is largely seen as an active scheduled event, in which an independent team is sourced to try to perform a simulated attack. Continuous passive security assessment is a variation of real-time monitoring, where, instead of focusing on the behavior of the external parties, you focus on the behavior of the system itself. It’s an early warning system of sorts that can detect traces of many abnormalities and security weaknesses before they are exploited.
  • Web application hardening
    One of my favorite uses for ModSecurity is attack surface reduction, in which you selectively narrow down the HTTP features you are willing to accept (e.g., request methods, request headers, content types, etc.). ModSecurity can assist you in enforcing many similar restrictions, either directly, or through collaboration with other Apache modules. They all fall under web application hardening. For example, it is possible to fix many session management issues, as well as cross-site request forgery vulnerabilities.
  • Something small, yet very important to you
    Real life often throws unusual demands to us, and that is when the flexibility of ModSecurity comes in handy where you need it the most. It may be a security need, but it may also be something completely different. For example, some people use ModSecurity as an XML web service router, combining its ability to parse XML and apply XPath expressions with its ability to proxy requests. Who knew?

Deployment Options

ModSecurity supports two deployment options: embedded and reverse proxy deployment. There is no one correct way to use them; choose an option based on what best suits your circumstances. There are advantages and disadvantages to both options:

  • Embedded
    Because ModSecurity is an Apache module, you can add it to any compatible version of Apache. At the moment that means a reasonably recent Apache version from the 2.0.x branch, although a newer 2.2.x version is recommended. The embedded option is a great choice for those who already have their architecture laid out and don’t want to change it. Embedded deployment is also the only option if you need to protect hundreds of web servers. In such situations, it is impractical to build a separate proxybased security layer. Embedded ModSecurity not only does not introduce new points of failure, but it scales seamlessly as the underlying web infrastructure scales. The main challenge with embedded deployment is that server resources are shared between the web server and ModSecurity.
  • Reverse proxy
    Reverse proxies are effectively HTTP routers, designed to stand between web servers and their clients. When you install a dedicated Apache reverse proxy and add ModSecurity to it, you get a ‘proper‘ network web application firewall, which you can use to protect any number of web servers on the same network. Many security practitioners prefer having a separate security layer. With it you get complete isolation from the systems you are protecting. On the performance front, a standalone ModSecurity will have resources dedicated to it, which means that you will be able to do more (i.e. have more complex rules). The main disadvantage of this approach is the new point of failure, which will need to be addressed with a high-availability setup of two or more reverse proxies.

You can install ModSecurity on most operating systems from the repository as it’s been around a fair while.

For Ubuntu/Debian

For Fedora/CentOS

For Microsoft IIS

ModSecurity v2.9.0 for IIS MSI Installer – 32bits
ModSecurity v2.9.0 for IIS MSI Installer – 64bits

Or read more here.


12 November 2015 | 1,737 views

ProtonMail DDoS Attack – Sustained & Sophisticated

So the ProtonMail DDoS Attack – if you’re not familiar ProtonMail is an secure, free, encrypted e-mail service that promises absolutely no compromises. It’s been getting hit hard since November 3rd, with a large scale rather sophisticated set of DDoS attacks rendering it unable to receive or send e-mail.

ProtonMail DDoS Attack - Sustained & Sophisticated

It seems to have mitigated the bulk of attack, but is still going up and down. In a way it’s a good thing tho, it’s improved the reputation of ProtonMail and shows that it’s fairly likely their system is very secure, if it wasn’t breached.

Sustained DDoS attacks are the domain of frustrated people who can’t get into a site/service any other way – so they make it inaccessible. Remember security is a triangle of confidentiality, integrity and availability. If you can’t breach the confidentiality or integrity, go after the availability.

ProtonMail has announced that it has successfully mitigated the DDoS attacks which had hobbled it since last week, while also confirming security systems had not been breached.

The encrypted email service was still being hit as of yesterday, after paying a Bitcoin ransom to one of the two DDoS attackers (the smaller, seemingly less powerful one), known as the Armada Collective, largely due to pressure from other affected companies.

The Swiss Government’s CERT (Computer Emergency Response Team) has today published a notice discouraging the payment of ransoms to DDoS attackers.

ProtonMail stated that it is “happy to announce … that after several days of intense work, we have largely mitigated the DDoS attacks against us.”

“These attacks took ProtonMail offline making it impossible to access emails, but did not breach our security,” according to a statement sent to The Register.

The attacks against the company have continued, but due to “the valiant efforts” of ProtonMail partners, IP-Max and Radware, they “are no longer capable of knocking ProtonMail offline for extended periods of time.”

“As our infrastructure recovers over the next several days, there may still be intermittent service interruptions, but we have now largely restored all services.”

The DDoS targeting ProtonMail was extremely sophisticated, according to the company, which prides itself on offering a means of secure communication to “activists, dissidents, and journalists”.

There’s been a a fair bit of confusion too, with ProtonMail claiming there’s two attackers, one of which they’ve paid a ransom to. Their is a lot of collateral damage from this attack, as with any fairly sustained, heavyweight DDoS attack – it attacks anyone remotely near the victim (in the context of network infrastructure).

Those companies in the same datacenter would be down too, as the DDoS moves up the network chain to the ISP, the upstream Tier 2 provider and beyond. Depending how big it is – it can even impact an entire country or in the worse case scenario, the whole Internet.

It was “the largest and most extensive cyberattack in Switzerland,” according to ProtonMail, “with hundreds of other companies also hit as collateral damage”. The attack also completely took down the the data centre housing ProtonMail’s servers and even affected “several upstream ISPs, causing serious damage”.

Referencing the 300Gbps DDoS attack against Spamhaus in 2013, Herberger stated “basically, we have the attackers trying all possibilities to get to a DDoS situation”.

Asked about attribution, Herberger suggested the resources necessary for such a sizeable, varied, and persistent attack could indicate a nation state.

“It’s interesting,” he told The Register. “The conjecture around here is that a ‘truly’ secure email service is more likely to receive these kind of attacks” as it is the only way of preventing these “dark” communications, he added.

ProtonMail has stated that the attack set back its development timeline, and announced that it would no longer be releasing ProtonMail 3.0 at the end of November.

The Register understands that the attack was exceptionally aggressive, with ProtonMail previously stating that there were two stages (and two attackers) that had provoked the company’s woes.

With this kind of fire-power, it could definitely be a nation state attack. Briefly before the attack started, ProtonMail publicly critiquing the UK policies regarding encryption.

That’s a pretty far fetched conspiracy theory, but there’s a lot of stuff going around, especially with other encrypted e-mail providers and TOR exit nodes suffering DDoS attacks.

ProtonMail managed to raise over $50,000USD from a crowd-sourced campaign to help them mitigate the DDoS attack, so they seem to be ok for the moment.

You can keep up with the latest ProtonMail updates here:

Blog: ProtonMail Blog
Announcements: ProtonMail WordPress
Twitter: @ProtonMail

Source: The Register


10 November 2015 | 3,096 views

0d1n – Web HTTP Fuzzing Tool

0d1n is an open source web HTTP fuzzing tool and bruteforcer, its objective is to automate exhaustive tests and search for anomalies (you know, vulnerabilities). 0d1n can increase your productivity following web parameters, files, directories, forms and other things.

0d1n - Web HTTP Fuzzing Tool

Od1n is written in C and uses libcurl for performance.

Features

Some of the features of 0d1n are:

  • Brute force passwords in auth forms
  • Directory disclosure (use PATH list to brute, and find HTTP status code)
  • Test list on input to find SQL Injection and XSS vulnerabilities

Requirements

To run 0d1n requires:

  • GCC
  • make
  • libcurl –
  • Current version tested only Unix Like systems (Linux, MacOS and *BSD)

For examples on usage and stuff check the presentation here: 0d1n Web Hacking Tool [PDF]

You can download Od1n here:

0d1n-master.zip

Or read more here.


06 November 2015 | 5,433 views

SpiderFoot – Open Source Intelligence Automation Tool (OSINT)

SpiderFoot is an open source intelligence automation tool. Its goal is to automate the process of gathering intelligence about a given target, which may be an IP address, domain name, hostname or network subnet.

SpiderFoot - Open Source Intelligence Automation Tool (OSINT)

SpiderFoot can be used offensively, i.e. as part of a black-box penetration test to gather information about the target or defensively to identify what information your organisation is freely providing for attackers to use against you.

Purpose

There are three main areas where SpiderFoot can be useful:

  • If you are a pen-tester, SpiderFoot will automate the reconnaisance stage of the test, giving you a rich set of data to help you pin-point areas of focus for the test.
  • Understand what your network/organisation is openly exposing to the outside world. Such information in the wrong hands could be a significant risk.
  • SpiderFoot can also be used to gather threat intelligence about suspected malicious IPs you might be seeing in your logs or have obtained via threat intelligence data feeds.

Features

SpiderFoot has plenty of features, including the following:

  • Utilises a lot of different data sources; over 40 so far and counting, including SHODAN, RIPE, Whois, PasteBin, Google, SANS and more.
  • Designed for maximum data extraction; every piece of data is passed on to modules that may be interested, so that they can extract valuable information. No piece of discovered data is saved from analysis.
  • Runs on Linux and Windows. And fully open-source so you can fork it on GitHub and do whatever you want with it.
  • Visualisations. Built-in JavaScript-based visualisations or export to GEXF/CSV for use in other tools, like Gephi for instance.
  • Web-based UI. No cumbersome CLI or Java to mess with. Easy to use, easy to navigate. Take a look through the gallery for screenshots.
  • Highly configurable. Almost every module is configurable so you can define the level of intrusiveness and functionality.
  • Modular. Each major piece of functionality is a module, written in Python. Feel free to write your own and submit them to be incorporated!
  • SQLite back-end. All scan results are stored in a local SQLite database, so you can play with your data to your heart’s content.
  • Simultaneous scans. Each footprint scan runs as its own thread, so you can perform footprinting of many different targets simultaneously.

You can download SpiderFoot 2.6.0 here:

Windows – SpiderFoot-2.6.0-w32.zip
Linux – spiderfoot-2.6.0-src.tar.gz

Or read more here.


04 November 2015 | 1,121 views

TalkTalk Hack – Breach WAS Serious & Disclosed Bank Details

So it turns out the TalkTalk hack is a lot more serious than they initially tried to make it out to be, TalkTalk claimed that it’s core system wasn’t compromised and only the website was breached.

TalkTalk Hack - Breach WAS Serious & Disclosed Bank Details

But now they’ve admitted the hackers got away with bank account numbers, partial credit card numbers and dates of birth.

British telecoms company TalkTalk has published information regarding the details accessed by hackers in the recent data breach, and law enforcement has announced the arrest of a third suspect in the case.

Shortly after launching an investigation into the incident, TalkTalk attempted to downplay the incident saying that the attackers only breached its website and not its core systems, and that the amount of data exposed is significantly smaller than initially believed.

The company has now revealed that the hackers gained access to less than 21,000 bank account numbers and sort codes, less than 28,000 credit and debit cards, and less than 15,000 dates of birth. As it stated earlier in the investigation, the payment card numbers compromised in the breach are incomplete (i.e. six middle digits are blanked out), which means fraudsters cannot use the information directly to steal money from bank accounts.

TalkTalk also reported that the attackers accessed the names, email addresses and phone numbers of less than 1.2 million customers. The data, allegedly obtained by hackers after exploiting a SQL injection vulnerability, has been reportedly sold on cybercrime forums.

All affected individuals will be contacted and informed about the type of information that has been compromised.

The bad guys also got access to limited details from over 1 Million customers, which is a pretty serious leak. There have been some arrests in the UK since the incident, but mostly young teenagers who maybe got hold of the exploit later or took part in the DDoS.

I don’t really see a 16 year old from Norwich being the mastermind of a complex attack like this. Thankfully for TalkTalk the credit card details were stored with the middle 6 digits missing, so they are pretty useless to carders.

“As we have previously confirmed, the credit and debit card details cannot be used for financial transactions. In addition, we have shared the affected bank details with the major UK banks so they can take their usual actions to protect customers’ accounts in the highly unlikely event that a criminal attempts to defraud them,” TalkTalk said on Friday. “We also encourage you to take up the free 12 months of credit monitoring alerts with Noddle, one of the leading credit reference agencies.”

While the compromised data cannot be used directly to steal money from accounts, it can be highly useful for social engineering attacks, and now that TalkTalk told customers to expect to be contacted, such schemes could become even more successful. TalkTalk users have been warned that scammers and cybercriminals might leverage the recent incident to trick them into handing over bank details and passwords (TalkTalk says it will only ask for two digits), and installing malicious software.

The Metropolitan Police announced over the weekend the arrest of a third suspect in this case, a 20-year-old man from Staffordshire. Investigators had previously arrested a 15-year-old boy from Northern Ireland, and a 16-year-old from Feltham.

The teens were arrested on suspicion of committing offences covered by the Computer Misuse Act, and were later released on bail.

It’s certainly an interesting case, and from the way TalkTalk has acted – it could possibly go even deeper than this. With them already proving they are fully capable of covering up what really happened (at least for a limited time period).

I expect much more news to be cropping up over this in the coming months, if you want to see an absolute train wreck, just watch these:

Talk Talk CEO Dido Harding on the cyber attack – Newsnight
TalkTalk boss: I won’t guarantee against future hacks

Source: Security Week


02 November 2015 | 3,909 views

Scumblr by Netflix – Automatically Scan For Leaks

Scumblr is a search automation web application that helps you to automatically scan for leaks by performing periodic searches and storing / taking actions on the identified results. Scumblr uses the Workflowable gem to allow setting up flexible workflows for different types of results.

Scumblr by Netflix - Automatically Scan For Leaks

How do I use Scumblr?

Scumblr is a web application based on Ruby on Rails. In order to get started, you’ll need to setup / deploy a Scumblr environment and configure it to search for things you care about. You’ll optionally want to setup and configure workflows so that you can track the status of identified results through your triage process.

What can Scumblr look for?

Just about anything! Scumblr searches utilize plugins called Search Providers. Each Search Provider knows how to perform a search via a certain site or API (Google, Bing, eBay, Pastebin, Twitter, etc.). Searches can be configured from within Scumblr based on the options available by the Search Provider. What are some things you might want to look for? How about:

  • Compromised credentials
  • Vulnerability / hacking discussion
  • Attack discussion
  • Security relevant social media discussion

Searches

Scumblr includes a number of search providers by default. These include:

  • Google
  • YouTube
  • Facebook
  • Apple AppStore
  • Google Play Store
  • eBay
  • Twitter

Scumblr found stuff, now what?

Up to you! You can create simple or complex workflows to be used along with your results. This can be as simple as marking results as “Reviewed” once they’ve been looked at, or much more complex involving multiple steps with automated actions occurring during the process.

You can download Scumblr here:

Scumblr-master.zip

Or read more here.


30 October 2015 | 1,693 views

DAMM – Differential Analysis of Malware in Memory

Differential Analysis of Malware in Memory (DAMM) is a tool built on top of Volatility Framework. Its main objective is as a test bed for some newer techniques in memory analysis, including performance enhancements via persistent SQLite storage of plugin results (optional); comparing in-memory objects across multiple memory samples, for example processes running in an uninfected samples versus those in an infected sample; data reduction via smart filtering (e.g., on a pid across several plugins); and encoding a set of expert domain knowledge to sniff out indicators of malicious activity, like hidden processes and DLLs, or windows built-in processes running form the wrong directory.

DAMM - Differential Analysis of Malware in Memory

It is meant as a proving ground for interesting new techniques to be made available to the community. These techniques are an attempt to speed up the investigation process through data reduction and codifying some expert knowledge.

Features

  • ~30 Volatility plugins combined into ~20 DAMM plugins (e.g., pslist, psxview and other elements are combined into a ‘processes’ plugin)
  • Can run multiple plugins in one invocation
  • The option to store plugin results in SQLite databases for preservation or for “cached” analysis
  • A filtering/type system that allows easily filtering on attributes like pids to see all information related to some process and exact or partial matching for strings, etc.
  • The ability to show the differences between two databases of results for the same or similar machines and manipulate from the cmdline how the differencing operates
  • The ability to warn on certain types of suspicious behavior
  • Output for terminal, tsv or grepable

Usage

Most DAMM output looks better piped through ‘less -S’ (upper ‘S’) as in:

Warnings

In an attempt to make the triage process even easier, DAMM has an experimental warning system built in to sniff out signs of malicious activity including:

For certain Windows processes:

  • incorrect parent/child relationships
  • hidden processes
  • incorrect binary path
  • incorrect default priority
  • incorrect session

For all processes, and loaded DLLs and modules:

  • loaded/run from temp directory

For DLLs:

  • bogus extensions
  • hidden DLLs

Plus more!

  • PE headers in injections
  • SIDs giving domain access
  • debug privileges …

See the warnings.py file for much more information on what DAMM checks for.

DAMM-v1.0.zip

You can download DAMM here:

Or read more here.


29 October 2015 | 2,075 views

FBI Recommends Crypto Ransomware Victims Just Pay

Crypto ransomware is a type of malware that holds you ransom by encrypting your files and has been around for a while, but the FBI recently said at a cyber security summit that they advise companies that fall victim just to pay.

FBI Recommends Crypto Ransomware Victims Just Pay

Such malware tends to use pretty strong encryption algorithms like RSA-2048, which you aren’t going to be able to crack. So yah, pragmatically speaking if you got stung by this type of infection – you don’t really have much choice other than to pay.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) advises companies that fall victim to hacks involving Cryptolocker, Cryptowall or other forms of ransomware to pay the ransom, said Joseph Bonavolonta, an assistant special agent with FBI, speaking at the Cyber Security Summit 2015 in Boston

Noting that while the agency has their back, “the ransomware is that good,” the Security Ledger quoted Bonavolonta as saying. “To be honest, we often advise people just to pay the ransom” because efforts by the Bureau to defeat the encryption used have proved futile.

But he added that the success of the ransomware has benefited the victims in a twisted way because having so many people willing to pay has driven the price down since malware authors are less likely to try to charge excessive ransom amounts.

Even with all the power the Bureau has, they can’t crack this kind of stuff. And well even if they could, they aren’t going to fire up their super computer farm again some companies encrypted stash of ransomed Excel documents.

It’s interesting to see them kind of officially say it though, that this ransomware is really well made and you don’t really have much choice.

Stu Sjouwerman, CEO at KnowBe4, told SCMagazine.com that he agrees in part with the Bonavolonta’s advice because if a company stands to lose week’s or month’s worth of work while trying to decrypt its files, paying out $500 or so in ransom can be viewed as the equivalent of what he called a cheap “security audit.”

However, Sjouwerman said that the FBI should focus more on education and prevention rather than just giving in to the bad guys.

“I understand where they are coming from but rewarding the bad guys for bad behavior will only reinforce bad behavior,” Sjouwerman said.

He recommended that companies have backup files that are regularly tested, be religious about application and operating system updates, and ensure employees are trained in cybersecurity best practices.

So yah, if you run an organisation, without backups – you kinda deserve this kinda scam coming in your direction. But just be aware, if you do get an infection it could be costly and a royal pain in the arse.

Source: SC Magazine


27 October 2015 | 27,232 views

Infernal Twin – Automatic Wifi Hacking Tool

Infernal Twin is an automatic wifi hacking tool, basically a Python suite created to aid penetration testers during wireless assessments, it automates many of the common attacks – which can get complicated and hard to manage when executed manually.

Infernal Twin - Automatic Wifi Hacking Tool

The author noticed a gap in the market with there being many tools to automate web application testing and network pen-tests, but nothing really aimed at Wifi apart from some commercial tools. So this is an attempt to create a ‘1-click’ style wifi attack tool – something like Metasploit. A framework with a whole bunch of different attack vectors bundled together in one interface.

Features

  • WPA2 hacking
  • WEP Hacking
  • WPA2 Enterprise hacking
  • Wireless Social Engineering
  • SSL Strip
  • Evil Access Point Creation
  • Infernal Wireless
  • Report generation
  • PDF Report
  • HTML Report
  • Note taking function
  • Data is saved into Database
  • Network mapping
  • MiTM
  • Probe Request

The tool leverages the work done on other utilities to avoid reinventing the wheel, popular wifi security tools such as aircrack-ng and SSLStrip.

You can download Infernal Twin here:

infernal-twin-master.zip

Or read more here.