creepy – A Geolocation Information Aggregator AKA OSINT Tool

Keep on Guard!


creepy is an application that allows you to gather geolocation related information about users from social networking platforms and image hosting services. The information is presented in a map inside the application where all the retrieved data is shown accompanied with relevant information (i.e. what was posted from that specific location) to provide context to the presentation.

Creepy

Features

  • Automatic caching of retrieved information in order to reduce API calls and the possibility of hiting limit rates.
  • GUI with navigateable map for better overview of the accumulated information
  • 4 Maps providers (including Google Maps) to use.
  • Open locations in Google Maps in your browser
  • Export retrieved locations list as kmz (for Google Earth) or csv files.
  • Handling twitter authentication in an easy way using oAuth. User credentials are not shared with the application.
  • User/target search for twitter and flickr.

Map Providers

  • Google Maps
  • Virtual Maps
  • Open Street Maps

Information Retrieval Using

  • Twitter’s tweet location
  • Coordinates when tweet was posted from mobile device
  • Place (geographical name) derived from users ip when posting on twitter’s web interface. Place gets translated into coordinates using geonames.com
  • Bounding Box derived from users ip when posting on twitter’s web interface.The less accurate source , a corner of the bounding box is selected randomly.
  • Geolocation information accessible through image hosting services API
  • EXIF tags from the photos posted.

Social Networking Platforms Supported

  • Twitter
  • Foursquare (only checkins that are posted to twitter)
  • Gowalla (only checkins that are posted to twitter)

Image Hosting Services Supported

  • flickr – information retrieved from API
  • twitpic.com – information retrieved from API and photo exif tags
  • yfrog.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • img.ly – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • plixi.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • twitrpix.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • foleext.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • shozu.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • pickhur.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • moby.to – information retrieved from API and photo exif tags
  • twitsnaps.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags
  • twitgoo.com – information retrieved from photo exif tags

You can download creepy here:

CreepySetup_0.1.94.exe

Or read more here.

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Posted in: Privacy, Web Hacking

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