LaZagne – Password Recovery Tool For Windows & Linux

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


The LaZagne project is an open source password recovery tool used to retrieve passwords stored on a local computer. Each software stores its passwords using different techniques (plaintext, APIs, custom algorithms, databases and so on). This tool has been developed for the purpose of finding these passwords for the most commonly-used software. At this moment, it supports 22 Programs on Microsoft Windows and 12 on a Linux/Unix-Like operating systems.

LaZagne - Password Recovery Tool For Windows & Linux

It supports a whole bunch of software including things like CoreFTP, Cyberduck, FileZilla, PuttyCM, WinSCP, Chrome, Firefox, IE, Opera, Jitsi, Pidgin, Outlook, Thunderbird, Tortoise, Wifi passwords and more.

Usage

Retrieve version

Launch all modules

Launch only a specific module

Launch only a specific software script

Write all passwords found into a file (-w options)

Use a file for dictionary attacks (used only when it’s necessary: mozilla masterpassword, system hahes, etc.). The file has to be a wordlist in cleartext (no rainbow), it has not been optimized to be fast but could useful for basic passwords.

Change verbosity mode (2 different levels)

You can download laZagne here:

Windows – laZagne-Windows.zip
Source – Source-1.1.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Linux Hacking, Password Cracking, Windows Hacking

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5 Responses to LaZagne – Password Recovery Tool For Windows & Linux

  1. shadowdancer December 29, 2015 at 4:51 am #

    Hi, great tool :)

    Is it possible to lauch lazagne against a network target? (LAN)

    Thanks

    • Darknet December 29, 2015 at 4:29 pm #

      No it’s not, because the credentials are stored locally on the machine. You’d have to gain access to the machine with something like SprayWMI on the LAN and run Lazagne via a reverse shell or similar.

      • shadowdancer December 30, 2015 at 5:46 am #

        Thanks for the tip ;)

  2. Steven December 29, 2015 at 4:45 pm #

    Great tool thanks!

    does it work on the “non running system”?
    like if I dual boot a Windows machine on linux to extract saved passwords?
    thanks

    • Darknet December 29, 2015 at 4:53 pm #

      It potentially could, I honestly don’t know though. Definitely worth a try, as long as the Windows partition is mounted within the Linux OS.