Scumblr by Netflix – Automatically Scan For Leaks

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


Scumblr is a search automation web application that helps you to automatically scan for leaks by performing periodic searches and storing / taking actions on the identified results. Scumblr uses the Workflowable gem to allow setting up flexible workflows for different types of results.

Scumblr by Netflix - Automatically Scan For Leaks

How do I use Scumblr?

Scumblr is a web application based on Ruby on Rails. In order to get started, you’ll need to setup / deploy a Scumblr environment and configure it to search for things you care about. You’ll optionally want to setup and configure workflows so that you can track the status of identified results through your triage process.

What can Scumblr look for?

Just about anything! Scumblr searches utilize plugins called Search Providers. Each Search Provider knows how to perform a search via a certain site or API (Google, Bing, eBay, Pastebin, Twitter, etc.). Searches can be configured from within Scumblr based on the options available by the Search Provider. What are some things you might want to look for? How about:

  • Compromised credentials
  • Vulnerability / hacking discussion
  • Attack discussion
  • Security relevant social media discussion

Searches

Scumblr includes a number of search providers by default. These include:

  • Google
  • YouTube
  • Facebook
  • Apple AppStore
  • Google Play Store
  • eBay
  • Twitter

Scumblr found stuff, now what?

Up to you! You can create simple or complex workflows to be used along with your results. This can be as simple as marking results as “Reviewed” once they’ve been looked at, or much more complex involving multiple steps with automated actions occurring during the process.

You can download Scumblr here:

Scumblr-master.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Countermeasures, Privacy, Security Software


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