unix-privesc-check – Unix/Linux User Privilege Escalation Scanner

The New Acunetix V12 Engine


Unix-privesc-checker is a Unix/Linux User privilege escalation scanner that runs on Unix systems (tested on Solaris 9, HPUX 11, Various Linuxes, FreeBSD 6.2). It tries to find misconfigurations that could allow local unprivileged users to escalate privileges to other users or to access local apps (e.g. databases).

It’s similar in some ways to – LinEnum – Linux Enumeration & Privilege Escalation Tool.

unix-privesc-check - Unix/Linux User Privilege Escalation Scanner

It is written as a single shell script so it can be easily uploaded and run (as opposed to un-tarred, compiled and installed). It can run either as a normal user or as root (obviously it does a better job when running as root because it can read more files).

unix-privesc-check is intended to be run by security auditors and penetration testers against systems they have been engaged to assess, and also by system administrators who want to check for “obvious” misconfiguration. It can even be run as a cron job so you can check regularly for misconfiguration that might be introduced.


The author wanted to write something that was at least partially useful to penetration testers when they gained access to a low-privilege account and wanted to escalate privileges. There are lots of things that pen-testers will check in this situation and one of the most tedious to check is weak file permissions – this of often one of the most fruitful, though, so there’s no avoiding it.

Checks Performed

  • Writable Home Directories
  • Readable /etc/shadow
  • Weak Permissions On Cron Jobs
  • Writable Configuration Files
  • Writable Device Files
  • Readable Files In Home Directories
  • Running Processes Correspond To Writable Programs
  • sudo Configuration
  • Accounts with no Password

You can download v2.1 here:

master.zip

Or read more here.

Posted in: Linux Hacking, Security Software


Latest Posts:


Intercepter-NG - Android App For Hacking Intercepter-NG – Android App For Hacking
Intercepter-NG is a multi functional network toolkit including an Android app for hacking, the main purpose is to recover interesting data from the network stream and perform different kinds of MiTM attacks.
dcipher - Online Hash Cracking Using Rainbow & Lookup Tables dcipher – Online Hash Cracking Using Rainbow & Lookup Tables
dcipher is a JavaScript-based online hash cracking tool to decipher hashes using online rainbow & lookup table attack services.
HTTP Security Considerations - An Introduction To HTTP Basics HTTP Security Considerations – An Introduction To HTTP Basics
HTTP is ubiquitous now with pretty much everything being powered by an API, a web application or some kind of cloud-based HTTP driven infrastructure. With that HTTP Security becomes paramount and to secure HTTP you have to understand it.
Cangibrina - Admin Dashboard Finder Tool Cangibrina – Admin Dashboard Finder Tool
Cangibrina is a Python-based multi platform admin dashboard finder tool which aims to obtain the location of website dashboards by using brute-force, wordlists etc.
Enumall - Subdomain Discovery Using Recon-ng & AltDNS Enumall – Subdomain Discovery Using Recon-ng & AltDNS
Enumall is a Python-based tool that helps you do subdomain discovery using only one command by combining the abilities of Recon-ng and AltDNS.
RidRelay - SMB Relay Attack For Username Enumeration RidRelay – SMB Relay Attack For Username Enumeration
RidRelay is a Python-based tool to enumerate usernames on a domain where you have no credentials by using a SMB Relay Attack with low privileges.


3 Responses to unix-privesc-check – Unix/Linux User Privilege Escalation Scanner

  1. Doug Royer June 23, 2015 at 6:52 am #

    It looks good. It incorrectly reports sym links as allowing world read/write access to the file it points to.

  2. Really June 24, 2015 at 4:42 am #

    Dude, this is like 7.5 yrs old already!
    Really?

    • Darknet June 27, 2015 at 2:14 am #

      Yah because Linux architecture and file permissions have fundamentally changed in the past 7.5 years…

      Oh wait..