Archive | July, 2010

Sagan – Real-time System & Event Log (syslog) Monitoring System

Outsmart Malicious Hackers


Softwink announces the release of Sagan, the ultimate in Syslog monitoring. Sagan can alert you when events are occurring in your syslogs that need your attention right away, in real time!

Sagan is a multi-threaded, real time system- and event-log monitoring system, but with a twist. Sagan uses a “Snort” like rule set for detecting “bad things” happening on your network and/or computer systems. If Sagan detects a “bad thing” happening, that event can be stored to a Snort database (MySQL/PostgreSQL) and Sagan will correlate the event with your Snort Intrusion Detection/Intrusion Prevention (IDS/IPS) system. Sagan is meant to be used in a ‘centralized’ logging environment, but will work fine as part of a standalone Host IDS system for workstations.

Sagan is fast: Sagan is written in C and is a multi-threaded application. Sagan is threaded to prevent blocking Input/Output (I/O). For example, data processing doesn’t stop when an SQL query is needed. It is also meant to be as efficient as possible in terms of memory and CPU usage.

Sagan uses a “Snort” like rule set: If you’re a user of “Snort” and understand Snort rule sets, then you already understand Sagan rule sets. Essentially, Sagan is compatible with Snort rule management utilities, like “oinkmaster” for example.

Sagan can log to Snort databases: Sagan will operate as a separate “sensor” ID to a Snort database. This means that your IDS/IPS events from Snort will remain separate from your Sagan (syslog/event log) events. Since Sagan can utilize Snort databases, using Snort front-ends like BASE and Snorby will not only work with your IDS/IPS event, but also with your syslog events as well!

Sagan output formats: You don’t have to be a Snort user to use Sagan. Sagan supports multiple output formats, such as a standard output file log format (similar to Snort), e-mailing of alerts (via libesmtp), Logzilla support and externally based programs that you can develop using the language you prefer (Perl/Python/C/etc).

Sagan is actively developed: Softwink, Inc. actively develops and maintains the Sagan source code and rule sets. Softwink, Inc. uses Sagan to monitor security related log events on a 24/7 basis.

Other Features:

  • Sagan is meant to be easy to install. The traditional, “./configure && make && make install” works for many installations depending on the functionality needed and configuration.
  • Thresholding of alerts. Uses the same format as Snort in the Sagan rule set.
  • Attempts to pull TCP/IP addresses, port information, and protocol of rule set that was triggered. This leads to better correlation.
  • Can be used to monitor just about any type of device or system (Routers, firewalls, managed switches, IDS/IPS systems, Unix/Linux systems, Windows event logs, wireless access points & much more).
  • Works ‘out of the box’ with Snort front ends like BASE, Snorby, proprietary consoles, various Snort based reporting systems.
  • Sagan is ‘open source’ and released under the GNU/GPL version 2 license.

You can download Sagan here:

sagan-current.tar.gz

Or read more here.

Posted in: Countermeasures, Forensics, Networking Hacking, Security Software

Topic: Countermeasures, Forensics, Networking Hacking, Security Software


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Clever Attack Allows Theft Of Names & Addresses From IE & Safari

Outsmart Malicious Hackers


There has been some very clever attacks lately, especially involving browsers and the kind of data they can leak when probed the right way. The biggest press recently was generated by the history leak that occurs in most browsers.

Another clever attack that got some coverage lately was tabnapping and the latest is another fascinating way to lift information from browsers using the auto-complete feature.

It’s good to see these kind of attacks, when you think about technically how they operate – they are fairly simple. But in saying that it takes a leap in logic to even get to the point where you can start coding for something like this.

The Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Safari browsers are susceptible to attacks that allow webmasters to glean highly sensitive information about the people visiting their sites, including their full names, email addresses, location, and even stored passwords, a security researcher says.

In a talk scheduled for next week’s Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas, Jeremiah Grossman, CTO of White Hat Security, plans to detail critical weaknesses that are enabled by default in the browsers, which are the four biggest by market share. The vulnerabilities have yet to be purged by the respective browser makers despite months, and in some cases, years of notice.

Among the most serious is a vulnerability in Apple’s Safari and earlier versions of Microsoft’s IE that exposes names, email addresses, and other sensitive information when a user visits a booby-trapped website. The attack exploits the browsers’ autocomplete feature used to automatically enter commonly typed text into websites. It works by creating a webpage with fields carrying titles such as “First Name,” “Last Name,” “Email Address,” and “Credit Card Number” and then adding javascript that simulates the user entering various letters, numbers or keystrokes into each one.

It seems all 4 of the main browsers are susceptible to this, although the implementation varies slightly for each browser. Hacking wise that’s not a big problem as you can just do a user agent string identification when the user lands on the malicious page and serve them up with the relevant info grabbing script for their browser type.

The worst case scenario is if this flaw allows malicious pages to gather user passwords that are stored in the browser, combined with the ability to probe the browser to see which sites they have visited..it could multiply into a quite accurate and potentially dangerous attack.

The worst effected is the Safari and older versions of Internet Explorer.


Users who in the past have used the autocomplete features to store that information in versions 6 and 7 of IE or versions 4 and 5 of Safari will find that the information will be automatically zapped to the rogue website. No interaction is necessary other than to visit the page. Webmasters can set the input fields to be invisible to better conceal the attack.

In the case of Safari, Grossman’s proof-of-concept attack simulates a user entering various letters or numbers into the fields. In a demonstration, when the script entered the letter J under a field titled “Name,” the browser automatically exposed “Jeremiah Grossman” to the web server. Grossman said he alerted Apple to the vulnerability on June 17, but received no reply other than an automatic response saying his message had been received.

“I would never have talked about this publicly if Apple had taken this seriously,” he told The Register. “I figured somebody else must have found this before because it’s so brain-dead simple.” When he sent a follow up query “I never heard anything back, human or robotic.”

Tricking IE 6 and 7 into coughing up the autocomplete details works in a similar fashion, but instead of simulating the entering of numbers or letters into a field, Grossman enters a user’s down arrow twice and then the enter key to extract the stored information. If more than one record is stored in that field, the script will repeat the process so they can be lifted as well.

Apart from the above flaws he seems to have uncovered a whole lot of bugs in all the major browsers including ways to steal passwords from Firefox and Chrome by using bugs + XSS attacks.

Another neat trick is the ability to erase all cookies on a users computer, not really dangerous but certainly annoying. The trick is to spawn more cookies than the browser can handle (about 3000 for Firefox) so the browser will delete all older cookies. The PoC for this takes about 2.5 seconds!

It’ll be interesting to see the whole talk at BlackHat.

Source: The Register

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Privacy, Web Hacking

Topic: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Privacy, Web Hacking


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thc-ipv6 Toolkit – Attacking the IPV6 Protocol

Outsmart Malicious Hackers


A complete tool set to attack the inherent protocol weaknesses of IPV6 and ICMP6, and includes an easy to use packet factory library. Please note to get full access to all the available tools you need to develop IPV6 tools yourself or submit patches, tools and feedback to the thc-ipv6 project.

The Tools

  • parasite6: icmp neighbor solitication/advertisement spoofer, puts you as man-in-the-middle, same as ARP mitm (and parasite)
  • alive6: an effective alive scanng, which will detect all systems listening to this address
  • dnsdict6: parallized dns ipv6 dictionary bruteforcer
  • fake_router6: announce yourself as a router on the network, with the highest priority
  • redir6: redirect traffic to you intelligently (man-in-the-middle) with a clever icmp6 redirect spoofer
  • toobig6: mtu decreaser with the same intelligence as redir6
  • detect-new-ip6: detect new ip6 devices which join the network, you can run a script to automatically scan these systems etc.
  • dos-new-ip6: detect new ip6 devices and tell them that their chosen IP collides on the network (DOS).
  • trace6: very fast traceroute6 with supports ICMP6 echo request and TCP-SYN
  • flood_router6: flood a target with random router advertisements
  • flood_advertise6: flood a target with random neighbor advertisements
  • fuzz_ip6: fuzzer for ipv6
  • implementation6: performs various implementation checks on ipv6
  • implementation6d: listen daemon for implementation6 to check behind a FW
  • fake_mld6: announce yourself in a multicast group of your choice on the net
  • fake_mipv6: steal a mobile IP to yours if IPSEC is not needed for authentication
  • fake_advertiser6: announce yourself on the network
  • smurf6: local smurfer
  • rsmurf6: remote smurfer, known to work only against linux at the moment
  • sendpees6: a tool by willdamn@gmail.com, which generates a neighbor solicitation requests with a lot of CGAs (crypto stuff ;-) to keep the CPU busy. nice.

Limitations

This code currently only runs on:

  • Linux 2.6.x (because of /proc usage)
  • 32 Bit
  • Ethernet and Raw are supported (is there anything else necessary?)

You can download thc-ipv6 here:

thc-ipv6-1.2.tar.gz

Or read more here.

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Networking Hacking

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Mozilla Increases Security Bug Bounty To $3000

Outsmart Malicious Hackers


There’s been a number of bounty programs in the past year or so with Mozilla being one of the forerunners with their Mozilla Security Bug Bounty Program.

There are others like Google offering rewards for bugs in Chrome, and other specific high profile bounties like when Microsoft Offered $250K Bounty for Conficker Author.

Mozilla on Thursday boosted bug bounty payments six-fold by increasing the standard cash award to $3,000.

The new bounty for vulnerabilities in Firefox, Firefox Mobile and Thunderbird is also six times the normal payment by Google for flaws in its Chrome browser, and more than double the maximum $1,337 that Google pays for the most severe bugs. Mozilla and Google are the only browser makers that pay security researchers for reporting vulnerabilities in their products.

“A lot has changed in the six years since the Mozilla program was announced, and we believe that one of the best ways to keep our users safe is to make it economically sustainable for security researchers to do the right thing when disclosing information,” said Lucas Adamski, director of security engineering. Mozilla kicked off its bounty program in August 2004 .

Only bugs that Mozilla ranks “crucial” or “high” — its top two ratings — are eligible for payment. In Mozilla’s hierarchy, critical vulnerabilities are those that allow remote code execution; in other words, ones that when exploited give the attacker full control of the machine. High vulnerabilities are those that expose “high-value” personal information, such as usernames, passwords and credit card numbers. Denial-of-service flaws are not eligible for a bounty, Mozilla said.

It’s a big increase too going from $500 all the way to $3000 which is more than double what Google offers for the most critical & clever bugs ($1337). You could earn a decent living if you could find one Mozilla bug a month, especially if you already have a stable monthly salary.

I doubt anyone would be able to find so many bugs, and even if they did it’s still way below the market rate for a real, remotely exploitable 0-day exploit.

I still think it’s a good initiative though and they’ve raised the bounty to make it a more viable option for security researchers to submit vulnerabilities directly to them.


Google launched its own cash-for-flaws program in January 2010, paying $500 for most bugs. Some vulnerabilities, however, earn their discoverer $1,000, or even $1,337, the latter given only to bugs that Chrome’s team judge’s “particularly severe or particularly clever.” The last time Google paid bounties was July 2, when it handed out $2,500 to a pair of researchers for reporting four vulnerabilities.

Adamski announced several other changes to Mozilla’s bounty program on the Mozilla security blog Thursday. Bugs in the Mozilla Suite, which the Mozilla Foundation dropped in 2005 — will no longer be eligible for bounties, said Adamski. But vulnerabilities in Firefox Mobile, Mozilla’s mobile browser, as well as any Mozilla services that Firefox or Thunderbird rely on for safe operation, are eligible.

Mozilla also added new language to its reward policy that gives it some new flexibility. “Mozilla reserves the right to not give a bounty payment if we believe the actions of the reporter have endangered the security of Mozilla’s end users,” the revised guidelines now state.

They do say in the statement that if you were paid to find the flaw (e.g. by your company as a security researcher) they would prefer if you didn’t apply for the bounty so they can award the money to people working independently.

So if any of you guys find any interesting flaws in Mozilla products, $3000 might be waiting for you!

Source: Network World

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Secure Coding, Web Hacking

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Metasploit Framework 3.4.1 Released – 16 New Exploits, 22 Modules & 11 Meterpreter Scripts

Keep on Guard!


The Metasploit Project is proud to announce the release of the Metasploit Framework version 3.4.1. This release sees the first official non-Windows Meterpreter payload, in PHP as discussed last month here.

Rest assured that more is in store for Meterpreter on other platforms. A new extension called Railgun is now integrated into Meterpreter courtesy of Patrick HVE, giving you scriptable access to Windows APIs and an unprecedented amount of control over post-exploitation.

For those of you wishing to contribute to the framework, a new file called HACKING has been introduced that lays out a few guidelines to make it easier.

This release contains 16 new exploits, 22 new auxiliary modules and 11 new Meterpreter scripts for your pwning enjoyment. The major changes in terms of numbers were:

  • 567 exploits and 283 auxiliary modules (up from 551 and 261 in v3.4)
  • Over 40 community reported bugs were fixed and numerous interfaces were improved

For more in-depth information about this release, see the 3.4.1 release notes here:

Metasploit 3.4.1 Release Notes

You can download Metasploit 3.4.1 here:

Windows – framework-3.4.1.exe
Linux (32-Bit) – framework-3.4.1-linux-i686.run

Or read more here.

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hacking Tools, Linux Hacking, Windows Hacking

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Sunbelt Software Bought By GFI For An Undisclosed Sum

Keep on Guard!


Looks like this is the way business is heading, especially in the software sector. As led by the giants Microsoft, acquisition is the way to get new and innovative software without having to produce it yourself!

Sunbelt Blog is one of the few we actually link to in the sidebar and also read regularly.

They always have some interesting and generally fairly technical analysis of malware attacks and other intrusions.

Mail security and software utilties company GFI Software has bought independent US antivirus company Sunbelt Software for an undisclosed sum.

GFI already offers a range of security products that use third-party antivirus engines from companies such as Kaspersky and BitDefender to make up the scanning element of its mostly SME-oriented products such as the GFI MailDefense suite. The Sunbelt Software buy gives the company access to an antivirus engine of its own for the first time.

GFI will now integrate Sunbelt’s heavily revised ‘Vipre’ detection technology across the range of its own products. The software has a good reputation for innovation and was rewritten from the ground up just over a year ago.

“We were impressed by the high quality and innovative technology that underlies Sunbelt’s Vipre line of products and immediately saw strong synergies between the two companies,” said GFI CEO, Walter Scott.

Both GFI and Sunbelt have some great software and services so I’d say this is a good integration for the industry. Plus it will give Sunbelt a lot more resources to develop it’s Vipre product and can probably make some improvements to GFI LANGuard too.

GFI will also get its hands on a malware detection engine that is already licensed to third-parties, generating standalone revenue of its own. Increasingly, merely selling antivirus and anti-malware is only one part of a business that depends on third-party licensing to stay afloat.

Sunbelt also has a distribution business, which is not part of the sale and will remain a separate entity, GFI said.

Smaller, independent antivirus companies selling out has been a steady trend, and is set to continue. The cash needed to keep development and marketing on track is getting harder to sustain at a time when free antivirus from Microsoft and others is taking away sales.

And the article raises an important point too, with Microsoft pushing out more and more free anti-virus and anti-malware solutions plus a lot of other free software becoming more visible (products like Avast and Avira are free for home use) it’s making it harder for anti-virus software developers to make a living.

That’s why being acquired by a larger company with a wider range of products and services can help a lot.

Source: Network World

Posted in: Malware

Topic: Malware


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