Twitter ClickJacking Vulnerability

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Click-jacking has hit the news a few times recently with most browsers being susceptible to this kind of redirection attack.

This time it’s Twitter that’s being hit, as with anything gaining popularity it’s going to become the focus of more attacks and attempts to compromise its security.

It seems like click-jacking may well be here to stay and it might become a widespread problem, especially for sites with interactive content and especially for those based around ‘voting‘ systems.

Two weeks after the micro-blogging site immunized its users against a fast-moving worm that caused them to unintentionally broadcast messages when they clicked on an innocuous-looking button, hackers have found a new way to exploit the clickjacking vulnerability.

The latest attack comes from UK-based web developer Tom Graham, who discovered that the fix Twitter rolled out wasn’t applied to the mobile phone section of the site. By the time we stumbled on his findings, the exploit no longer worked. But security consultant Rafal Los sent us a minor modification that sufficiently pwned a dummy account we set up for testing purposes.

“The mobile site currently has no javascript on it at all, which is probably for a good reason as most mobile phones don’t support it,” Graham writes. “So it begs the question, how should Twitter prevent this click-jacking exploit?”

This problem was once again quickly fixed, but I’m sure it can be tweaked again to wreak havoc. Plus of course these vulnerabilities are being published in the open and blown up on mass-media sites so they get attention quickly.

I’m sure there’s plenty of people out there who aren’t quite so honourable and are more interested in gaming the system for their own benefit.

It’s an interesting way for spammers to infest Twitter with spam on legitimate accounts, all they have to do is get the user to click a button somewhere on a quiz or game and it’s a done deal.

The proof-of-concept page presents the user with the question “Do you have a tiny face?” along with buttons to answer “yes” or “no.” Choosing the affirmative while logged in to Twitter causes the account to publicly declare: “I have a tiny face, do you?” and then include a link to Graham’s post.

The exploit is the latest reason to believe that clickjacking, on Twitter and elsewhere, is here to stay, at least until HTML specifications are rewritten. No doubt web developers will continue to come up with work-arounds, but hackers can just as quickly find new ways to exploit the vulnerability, it seems.

That’s because clickjacking attacks a fundamental design of HTML itself. It’s pulled off by hiding the target URL within a specially designed iframe that’s concealed by a decoy page that contains submission buttons. Virtually every website and browser is susceptible to the technique.

It’ll be interesting to see how long this cat and mouse chase goes on and if a version of the exploit can be crafted that will still work whatever Twitter does (discounting a major rebuild of their architecture and technology).

I’m sure other sites are vulnerable too, perhaps we’ll see Facebook version soon which will post a Note or a message on your profile crafted by the site serving up the click-jacking exploit.

Source: The Register

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8 Responses to Time Warner Hacked – AWS Config Exposes 4M Subscribers

  1. engineer September 7, 2017 at 9:36 pm #

    By default S3 buckets are not public.

    • Darknet September 7, 2017 at 9:59 pm #

      They used to be IIRC, but I could be wrong, well I guess more accurately the easiest way to get access to it programmatically is just to set it to public.

    • Engineer S September 10, 2017 at 10:09 pm #

      Yes, it had to be configured to be open to the web.  This story is not really about AWS.  It’s about bad IT controls and careless engineering.

      I wouldn’t even call this a hack, if it’s left open to the public.

  2. Alan M September 8, 2017 at 8:15 am #

    Broadsoft was responsible for exposing the Time Warner Cable (TWC) data. Time Warner (TC) is an entirely separate entity (TC does NOT = TWC).

    • Darknet September 8, 2017 at 3:48 pm #

      Hey thanks for that clarification Alan.

  3. Tracie September 8, 2017 at 8:17 pm #

    Also time Warner cable is no longer TWC . it is now spectrum.

  4. Ryan Dymek September 8, 2017 at 8:29 pm #

    Buckets have zero access beyond the creator. “Easiest way to grant access is to make it public”… that same statement applies to a cisco firewall in an onprem enterprise. And allow any rule is simple but terribly wrong. IAM or bucket policies are no more complex than any enterprise grade firewall. Lets not excuse the behavior of the admin due to ignorance.

    • Darknet September 8, 2017 at 9:22 pm #

      Not excusing it, just saying it happens that way, same reason by MongoDB worked out of the box with no auth and listening on every interface. Not ideal, but a lot of things are done in the name of ease and speed of deployment rather than looking at it with an eye on risk and the repercussions.

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