The Associative Word List Generator (AWLG) – Create Related Wordlists for Password Cracking

Outsmart Malicious Hackers


You may remember some time back we did a fairly exhaustive post on Password Cracking Wordlists and Tools for Brute Forcing.

Wyd the Password Profiling Tool also does something similar to AWLG but it’s a PERL script rather than being based online.

I’d prefer if AWLG let us download an offline version too personally.

About AWLG

The Associative Word List Generator (AWLG) is a tool that generates a list of words relevant to some subjects, by scouring the Internet in an automated fashion.

Inclusion Example: A search string including the words (without quotes): “steve carell” would give us a word list with lots of words associated with the actor Steve Carell. This includes all of the words from his MySpace page, words from the Wikipedia article on him, etc.

Exclusion Example: We know that Steve Carell is an actor for lots of things, including a show called “The Office”. A search string: “steve carell” with omissions: “office” and “michael scott” would find words from websites that mention Steve Carell, but do not mention the word “office”, “michael”, or “scott”.

Privacy policy

AWLG.org does not record any transmitted search strings or user information. AWLG.org does record statistical information such as total site usage, total number of words generated per search, etc.

You can get cracking with AWLG here:

http://awlg.org/index.gen

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Password Cracking

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5 Responses to The Associative Word List Generator (AWLG) – Create Related Wordlists for Password Cracking

  1. Darion January 14, 2009 at 9:19 am #

    This tells you ones again. Stay of the internet!

    I have tested this on my self and i din’t even found my own birthdate. It seems easy but will be ineffective if you ask me.

  2. dblackshell January 14, 2009 at 2:18 pm #

    I think it’s a great tool, because most of the time ‘general wordlists’ aren’t that useful. That’s when generated wordlists come at hand…

    Did some checkouts and it seems to grab a whole bunch of javascript from crawled pages…

  3. Bogwitch January 14, 2009 at 8:19 pm #

    Nice idea,
    I’m not keen on the idea of it being online as Darknet says and how much do you trust any site that states “AWLG.org does not record any transmitted search strings or user information. AWLG.org does record statistical information such as total site usage, total number of words generated per search, etc.”

  4. Bogwitch January 14, 2009 at 8:23 pm #

    Don’t hit submit until you’re finished.

    Like I said, an automated tool is not a bad idea however, I tend to use a more manual approach and then feed them through Brutus to generate a munged wordlist with appends, prepends and substitutions. I have had limited success with this approach but better than a standard dictionary, munged wordlist.

  5. nestahunter January 18, 2009 at 1:13 am #

    thnx so much man