Darknet - The Darkside

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12 June 2014 | 4,584 views

14-Year Olds Hack ATM With Default Password

Check For Vulnerabilities with Acunetix

This is actually a pretty good hack and a good use of the word hacking in the original sense, two curious teenagers managed to access the administrator mode of an ATM in Winnipeg, Canada by using the default password they found in a manual they downloaded online.

Ingenious and pretty forward thinking, I like the fact they were responsible about it too and headed to the branch to let them know there was an issue with the security of their ATM machines.

Hack ATM

I’m not surprised the bank staff were originally skeptical of the teenagers claims as it seems pretty unlikely a couple of 14 year olds could hack your ATM machines..

A Winnipeg BMO branch got an unlikely security tip from two 14-year-olds when the pair managed to get into an ATM’s operating system during their lunch break last Wednesday.

The Grade 9 students, Matthew Hewlett and Caleb Turon, used an ATM operators’ manual they found online to get into the administrator mode of an ATM at a Safeway grocery store. They saw how much money was in the machine, how many transactions there had been and other information usually off-limits for the average bank customer.

“We thought it would be fun to try it, but we were not expecting it to work,” Hewlett told the Winnipeg Sun. “When it did, it asked for a password.”

They managed to crack the password on the first try, a result of BMO’s machine using one of the factory default passwords that had apparently never been changed.

They took this information to a nearby BMO branch, where staff were at first skeptical of what the two high-schoolers were telling them. Hewlett and Turon headed back to the Safeway to get proof, coming back with printouts from the ATM that clearly showed the machine had been compromised.

A slightly more advanced hack I remember writing about a few years back was a group Stealing ATM Pin Numbers Using Thermal Imaging Cameras.

Of course back in 2008 there was the famous ATM hacker ‘Chao’ who gave out a bunch of ATM hacking tips.

ATM Hacks have been around for a long time in various forms (skimming being the most common) – and they will continue to be around.

The teens even changed the machine’s greeting from “Welcome to the BMO ATM” to “Go away. This ATM has been hacked.”

The BMO branch manager called security to follow up on what the teenagers had found, and even wrote them a note to take back to school as explanation for why they were late getting back to class.

According to the Sun, the note started with: “Please excuse Mr. Caleb Turon and Matthew Hewlett for being late during their lunch hour due to assisting BMO with security.

Ralph Marranca, a spokesperson for BMO’s head office, said no customer information was exposed when Turon and Hewlett probed the ATM’s system. He did not immediately respond to questions from Postmedia News about what steps the bank is taking to ensure security at its thousands of ATMs across the country.

I just hope this incident gets enough press that it alerts other banks to audit their ATM Security and ensure they aren’t using the default administrator password.

Of course the Retards category sees a fair number of ATM related requests too.

Source: Edmonton Journal



09 June 2014 | 2,062 views

OWASP Mantra 0.92 – Browser Based Security Framework

OWASP Mantra is a collection of free and open source tools integrated into a web browser, which can become handy for students, penetration testers, web application developers,security professionals etc. It is portable, ready-to-run, compact and follows the true spirit of free and open source software.

Mantra is lite, flexible, portable and user friendly with a nice graphical user interface. You can carry it in memory cards, flash drives, CD/DVDs, etc. It can be run natively on Linux, Windows and Mac platforms. It can also be installed on to your system within minutes. Mantra is absolutely free of cost and takes no time for you to set up.

OWASP Mantra

Mantra is a browser especially designed for web application security testing. By having such a product, more people will come to know the easiness and flexibility of being able to follow basic testing procedures within the browser. Mantra believes that having such a portable, easy to use and yet powerful platform can be helpful for the industry.
Mantra has many built in tools to modify headers, manipulate input strings, replay GET/POST requests, edit cookies, quickly switch between multiple proxies, control forced redirects etc. This makes it a good software for performing basic security checks and sometimes, exploitation. Thus, Mantra can be used to solve basic levels of various web

Mantra Provides

  • A web application security testing framework built on top of a browser.
  • Supports Windows, Linux(both 32 and 64 bit) and Macintosh.
  • Can work with other software like ZAP using built in proxy management function which makes it much more convenient.
  • Available in 9 languages: Arabic, Chinese – Simplified, Chinese – Traditional, English, French, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish and Turkish
  • Comes installed with major security distributions including BackTrack and Matriux

The full list of changes in v0.92 is available here:

OWASP Mantra Security Toolkit 0.92 beta – Janus

You can download OWASP Mantra here:

Windows: OWASP Mantra Janus.exe
Linux: OWASP Mantra Janus Linux 32.tar.gz / OWASP Mantra Janus Linux 64.tar.gz

Or read more here.


06 June 2014 | 1,130 views

Important OpenSSL Patch – 6 More Vulnerabilities

So after the Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL that turned the World upside down, there has a been a lot of focus on the codebase and the manner in which it was written. They’ve raised a bunch of money, an audit is underway and there has even been a fairly serious branch named LibreSSL (who are currently whining about not being told about this set of vulns).

OpenSSL Vulnerability

So yah if you have any Linux servers terminating SSL connections with OpenSSL (or LibreSSL) you really need to patch them now and reload any services using the library (or safer just to reboot if you’re not sure).

The good part this time is none of these are particularly easy to exploit, unlike Heartbleed – which could pretty much be abused by anyone.

The OpenSSL team today pushed out fixes for six security vulnerabilities in the widely used crypto library.

These holes include a flaw that enables man-in-the-middle (MITM) eavesdropping on encrypted connections, and another that allows miscreants to drop malware on at-risk systems.

A DTLS invalid fragment bug (CVE-2014-0195, affects versions 0.9.8, 1.0.0 and 1.0.1) can be used to inject malicious code into vulnerable software on apps or servers. DTLS is more or less TLS encryption over UDP rather than TCP, and is used to secure live streams of video, voice chat and so on.

However, an SSL/TLS MITM vulnerability (CVE-2014-0224, potentially affects all clients, and servers running 1.0.1 and 1.0.2-beta1) is arguably worse.

Users and administrators are advised to check their systems for updates; patched builds of OpenSSL are available from the major Linux distros, for instance.
Early CCS MITM logo, source: http://ccsinjection.lepidum.co.jp

The CVE-2014-0224 MITM bug has existed since the very first release of OpenSSL, according to Masashi Kikuchi, the Japanese security researcher who unearthed the flaw.

Let’s hope they don’t do a TrueCrypt and die after the audit because the code is so bad, they don’t have the resources to fix it. Some people are saying the money being raised should go straight to LibreSSL..but well, the World isn’t a huge fan of Theo and his OpenBSD ways – so that seems unlikely.

I’m sure there’s going to be a whole lot more flaws exposed in the months to come, this is just the beginnings. Let’s just hope that none are leaked (and critical) before the fixes and patches are made public.

The DTLS flaw has also given security experts the fear. “The OpenSSL DTLS vulnerability dates from April, but was reported today. It may allow remote-code execution (OpenSSL DTLS is still a nightmare),” noted computer-science professor Matthew Green in a Twitter update.

“This OpenSSL vuln is an example of the kind of subtle protocol bug that LibreSSL’s (admirable) fork is not likely to fix.”

The OpenSSL.org advisory comes just weeks after the discovery of the infamous Heartbleed vulnerability. Prof Green reckons none of the bugs would be easy to exploit – the direct opposite of the password-leaking Heartbleed hole. The other four fixes in today’s batch deal with denial-of-service-style vulnerabilities.

Nicholas J. Percoco, veep of strategic services at vulnerability management firm Rapid7, said a wide variety of servers and other internet-connected systems will need to be updated to guard against attackers exploiting these now-fixed bugs.

“The newly disclosed man-in-the-middle vulnerability disclosed in OpenSSL affects all client applications and devices that run OpenSSL when communicating to vulnerable servers of specific versions, but includes the most recent,” Percoco explained.

“This likely contains the majority of systems on the internet given most rushed to upgrade OpenSSL after the Heartbleed disclosure in early April of this year. A man-in-the-middle attack is dangerous because it can allow an attacker to intercept data that was presumed encrypted between a client – for example, an end user – and a server – eg, an online bank.

I’m honestly surprised (and a little sad) that’s it has taken this long for there to a big chunk of pressure on OpenSSL to clean up their code and be secure as it’s driving a large part of the Internet.

If you haven’t already done it – go and apply the OpenSSL Patch now.

Source: The Register


04 June 2014 | 1,695 views

OWASP NINJA-PingU – High Performance Large Scale Network Scanner

NINJA-PingU (NINJA-PingU Is Not Just A Ping Utility) is a free open-source high performance network scanner tool for large scale analysis. It has been designed with performance as its primary goal and developed as a framework to allow easy plugin integration.

OWASP NINJA-PingU Architecture

Essentially it’s a high performance, large scale network scanner, the likes of which we haven’t seen for some time. There were a few such projects around in 2008-2009 like Angry IP Scanner & Unicornscan.

It comes out of the box with a set of plugins for services analysisembedded devices identification and to spot backdoors.

NINJA PingU takes advantage of raw sockets to reduce the three-way TCP handshake latency and it’s state. Directly sending IP packets also avoids the TCP stack overhead. It also implements non-blocking networking I/O in the plugin’s interface by means of epoll. Each component is multithreaded and they have built-in caches to minimize synchronization points. In addition, the results persistment operations are buffered to reduce disk writes.

Options

You can download v1.0 here:

v1.0.tar.gz

Or check out the repo on Github here – https://github.com/OWASP/NINJA-PingU

Or read more here.


02 June 2014 | 871 views

Spotify Hacked – Rolls Out New Android App

So it looks like Spotify was hacked, or at least suffered some kind of breach – they claim user data for only one user was accessed and no payment details or password information was leaked. So it doesn’t seem to serious, but Spotify are reacting responsibly (which is good to see), disclosing the breach and taking action to make sure it doesn’t go any deeper.

As in most cases, once a malicious hacker or intruder has some kind of access, they will dig in deeper and eventually hit the motherload (like in the case of eBay for example).

Spotify Hacked

It seems to be something to do with the Android version of Spotify as they are asking users to download a new version (with completely new access tokens I assume), and re-enter their login credentials.

Spotify will ask all Android users of its streaming service to download a new version of its app after its internal systems were compromised.

The European music company disclosed the breach in a blog post on Tuesday. No password, financial, or payment information appears to have been accessed, and it only affected one user.

“We take these matters very seriously and as a general precaution will be asking certain Spotify users to re-enter their username and password to log in over the coming days,” explained Spotify’s chief technology officer, Oskar Stal, in a blog post. “As an extra safety step, we are going to guide Android app users to upgrade over the next few days.”

Though the breach was of a small scale, Spotify reacted quickly.

“As soon as we were aware of this issue we immediately launched an investigation. Information security and data protection are of great importance to us at Spotify,” the company explained in a more detailed FAQ on the breach.

Spotify has more than 40 million users and a big chunk of them are on Android, so this breach could have possibly exposed something fairly serious. But no real technical details have been released (as per norm) so we can’t really tell exactly what happened.

You can read the official blog post from the CTO here – Important Notice to Our Users

“Our evidence shows that only one Spotify user’s data has been accessed and this did not include any password, financial or payment information. We have reached out to this one individual. Based on our findings, we are not aware of any increased risk to users as a result of this incident.”

Given the tendency for breaches to quickly cascade into severe hacks, the company has chosen to react swiftly to try and quash any hacking attempts, we reckon.

“We do not believe this incident will affect your phone in any way. However, as an extra safety step, we are going to guide Android app users to upgrade over the next few days,” the company wrote.

However, users will lose all their offline playlists when they download the new app, so will have to re-download the songs to their phone. “We apologize for any inconvenience this causes, but hope you understand this is a necessary precaution to safeguard the quality of our service and protect our users.”

Whatever occurred, it doesn’t seem to effect iOS or Windows users at all and the general user base is not being asked to reset the passwords (nor even the Android users) so it does seem the user database is safe for the time being.

We will have to wait and see if any more details are forthcoming and if it turns out the hack went any deeper than currently publicised.

Source: The Register


30 May 2014 | 3,158 views

Bro – Passive Open-Source Network Traffic Analyzer

While focusing on network security monitoring, Bro provides a comprehensive platform for more general network traffic analysis as well. Well grounded in more than 15 years of research, Bro has successfully bridged the traditional gap between academia and operations since its inception. Today, it is relied upon operationally in particular by many scientific environments for securing their cyberinfrastructure. Bro’s user community includes major universities, research labs, supercomputing centers, and open-science communities.

Bro IDS Network Security Monitor

Bro is a passive, open-source network traffic analyzer. It is primarily a security monitor that inspects all traffic on a link in depth for signs of suspicious activity. More generally, however, Bro supports a wide range of traffic analysis tasks even outside of the security domain, including performance measurements and helping with trouble-shooting.

Features

  • Deployment
    • Runs on commodity hardware on standard UNIX-style systems (including Linux, FreeBSD, and MacOS).
    • Fully passive traffic analysis off a network tap or monitoring port.
    • Standard libpcap interface for capturing packets.
    • Real-time and offline analysis.
    • Cluster-support for large-scale deployments.
    • Unified management framework for operating both standalone and cluster setups.
    • Open-source under a BSD license.
  • Analysis
    • Comprehensive logging of activity for offline analysis and forensics.
    • Port-independent analysis of application-layer protocols.
    • Support for many application-layer protocols (including DNS, FTP, HTTP, IRC, SMTP, SSH, SSL).
    • Analysis of file content exchanged over application-layer protocols, including MD5/SHA1 computation for fingerprinting.
    • Comprehensive IPv6 support.
    • Tunnel detection and analysis (including Ayiya, Teredo, GTPv1). Bro decapsulates the tunnels and then proceeds to analyze their content as if no tunnel was in place.
    • Extensive sanity checks during protocol analysis.
    • Support for IDS-style pattern matching.
  • Scripting Language
    • Turing-complete language for expression arbitrary analysis tasks.
    • Event-based programming model.
    • Domain-specific data types such as IP addresses (transparently handling both IPv4 and IPv6), port numbers, and timers.
    • Extensive support for tracking and managing network state over time.
  • Interfacing
    • Default output to well-structured ASCII logs.
    • Alternative backends for ElasticSearch and DataSeries. Further database interfaces in preparation.
    • Real-time integration of external input into analyses. Live database input in preparation.
    • External C library for exchanging Bro events with external programs. Comes with Perl, Python, and Ruby bindings.
    • Ability to trigger arbitrary external processes from within the scripting language.

You can download The Bro here:

bro-2.2.tar.gz

Or read more here.


28 May 2014 | 2,072 views

Pirated ‘Watch Dogs’ Game Made A Bitcoin Mining Botnet

Pretty smart idea this one, we wrote about Yahoo! spreading Bitcoin mining malware back in January, but we haven’t really seen any of that type of activity since then.

Watch Dogs Bitcoin Mining Botnet

But this, this is a much better target audience – gamers with high powered GPUs! Especially as this is one of most hyped ‘next-gen’ games for 2014 (yes I’ve been eagerly awaiting it for my PS4). But pirating Watch Dogs via a torrent from popular warez group SkidRow could make you part of a Bitcoin mining botnet!

Tens of thousands of pirate gamers have been enslaved in a Bitcoin botnet after downloading a cracked copy of popular game Watch Dogs.

A torrent of the infected title, which supposedly has had its copy-protection removed, had almost 40,000 active users (seeders and leachers) and was downloaded a further 18,440 times on 23 May on one site alone.

Pirates reported on internet forums that the torrent package masquerading under the popular torrent brand SkidRow had quietly installed a Bitcoin miner along with a working copy of the game.

The Windows miner ran via two executables installed in the folder AppData\Roaming\OaPja and would noticeably slow down lower performance machines sucking up to a quarter of CPU power.

Most sources have removed the offending torrent. Analysis has yet to be done to determine the location or identities of actors behind the attack.

It seems like it was a massively popular torrent, so the infection could easily reach tens of thousands of pirate gamers, which would then turn into a Bitcoin mining botnet with tens of thousands of users (A fairly profitable proposition, even with the current Bitcoin mining difficulty).

It’s also slightly ironic that the tagline for the game is “Everything is connected” as if you pirate it, everyone is connected..to the botnet. And of course the fact it’s a game about ‘hacking’ – although I haven’t played it yet and the reports of the hacking part aren’t great.

Gamers were choice targets for Bitcoin mining malefactors because they often ran high-end graphical processing units (GPUs) and shunned resource-draining anti-virus platforms.

“If you happen to download cracked games via Torrent or other P2P sharing services, chances are that you may become a victim of [a] lucrative trojan bundled with a genuine GPU miner,” BitDefender chief strategist Catalin Cosoi said of an early Bitcoin miner that targeted gamers.

“We advise you to start checking your system for signs of infection, especially if you are constantly losing frames-per-second.”

Using stolen dispersed compute resources was one of the few ways punters could make decent cash by crunching the increasingly difficult mathematical algorithms required to earn Bitcoins.

Crims have in recent years foisted the compute-intensive Bitcoin miners in a host of attacks targeting valuable high-end GPUs right down to ludicrously slow digital video recorders.

They might have been better off mining something else though (Scrypt based coins like Litecoin or perhaps even X11 mining), if they did X11 mining the users probably wouldn’t even notice any framedrops or their GPU fans spinning at full speed.

I’m honestly surprised we don’t see more botnets based around cryptocurrency mining, I guess it’s just not that mainstream yet. And you need a good bait to get so many people to install malware these days (and get past their anti-virus software).

Which is another reason gamers make a good target as they often don’t even use AV software or disable it for maximum performance.

Source: The Register


26 May 2014 | 3,281 views

Moscrack – Cluster Cracking Tool For WPA Keys

Moscrack is a PERL application designed to facilitate cracking WPA keys in parallel on a group of computers. This is accomplished by use of either Mosix clustering software, SSH or RSH access to a number of nodes. With Moscrack’s new plugin framework, hash cracking has become possible. SHA256/512, DES, MD5 and *Blowfish Unix password hashes can all be processed with the Dehasher Moscrack plugin.

Moscrack

Features

  • Basic API allows remote monitoring
  • Automatic and dynamic configuration of nodes
  • Live CD/USB enables boot and forget dynamic node configuration
  • Uses aircrack-ng (including 1.2 Beta) by default
  • CUDA/OpenCL support via Pyrit plugin
  • CUDA support via aircrack-ng-cuda (untested)
  • Does not require an agent/daemon on nodes
  • Can crack/compare SHA256/512, DES, MD5 and blowfish hashes via Dehasher plugin
  • Supports mixed OS/protocol configurations
  • Supports SSH, RSH, Mosix for node connectivity
  • Effectively handles mixed fast and slow nodes or links
  • Supports Mosix clustering software
  • Nodes can be added/removed/modified while Moscrack is running
  • Failed/bad node throttling
  • Hung node detection
  • Reprocessing of data on error

You can download Moscrack here:

moscrack-2.08b.tar.gz

Or read more here.


22 May 2014 | 1,213 views

eBay Hacked – 128 Million Users To Reset Passwords

The big news this week is that the massive online auction site eBay has been hacked, the compromise appears to have taken place a few months around February/March but has only come to light recently when employee login credentials were used.

eBay Hacked

This is 3 times bigger than the massive 42 Million passwords leaked by Cupid Media last November. But as least they are hashed this time, in the case of Cupid Media – the passwords were in plain text.

eBay‬ has told people to change their passwords for the online tat bazaar after its customer database was compromised.

Names, dates of birth, phone numbers, physical addresses, email addresses, and “encrypted” passwords, were copied from servers by attackers, we’re told. Credit card numbers and other financial records were not touched, and are stored separately, eBay claims. The website has hundreds of millions of user accounts.

Hackers accessed the database between late February and early March after obtaining a few employees’ login credentials, and then infiltrated the corporate network.

The digital break-in of staff accounts was detected about two weeks ago, and sparked a computer-forensics probe that is still ongoing. The website’s investigators today revealed a database containing customer information was accessed by the hackers.

eBay reckons everyone should change their passwords as a precaution – but it hasn’t uncovered any evidence of fraud linked to the breach, it claims. One assumes eBay’s techies have closed the hole the attackers exploited to infiltrate its systems, and has cleared its systems of the miscreants.

The passwords should be reasonably secure as they are hashed and apparently salted too, but the encryption algorithm used is currently unknown. If the passwords do go public, perhaps we can use something like HashTag to identify the hash type and see how secure it is.

And the salting, whilst it doesn’t make a single password much more secure, it does make cracking sets of passwords with Rainbow Tables much harder.

eBay’s handling of the breach notification has already created a fair bit of confusion: eBay-owned PayPal published then deleted an alert instructing users to change up their passwords this morning.

The brief item on PayPal’s site, which included the line “place holder text”, was pulled before the security breach was confirmed soon after in a press release. The warning was eventually restored, although PayPal is not affected by the eBay hack.

The exposure of encrypted passwords is bad news because it’s now easy to create convincing phishing emails urging people to change their eBay passwords – although said scam emails will instead take victims to a site masquerading as eBay.com to swipe their details.

Weak passwords could also be easily cracked if the website’s hashing algorithm isn’t up to scratch, and woe betide anyone using the same crap password across multiple sites with the same email address. The habit of many users of using the same password on multiple sites makes this type of attack all too possible.

You can read the official release on the corporate site here:

eBay Inc. To Ask eBay Users To Change Passwords

I hope more technical details are released as everything seems a bit wishy-washy right now, like how exactly did they get compromised? The biggest danger right now is probably Phishing, someone could capitilize on the list of confirmed eBay users and e-mail them all to reset their passwords on a bogus site.

It’s early days though, I’m sure more info will be released as time goes by (or not, as corporates to tend to like to keep a lid on such incidents).

Source: The Register


20 May 2014 | 2,914 views

Hook Analyser 3.1 – Malware Analysis Tool

Hook Analyser is a freeware application which allows an investigator/analyst to perform “static & run-time / dynamic” analysis of suspicious applications, also gather (analyse & co-related) threat intelligence related information (or data) from various open sources on the Internet.

Essentially it’s a malware analysis tool that has evolved to add some cyber threat intelligence features & mapping.

Hook Analyser 3.1 - Malware Analysis Tool

Hook Analyser is perhaps the only “free” software in the market which combines analysis of malware analysis and cyber threat intelligence capabilities. The software has been used by major Fortune 500 organisations.

Features/Functionality

  • Spawn and Hook to Application – Enables you to spawn an application, and hook into it
  • Hook to a specific running process – Allows you to hook to a running (active) process
  • Static Malware Analysis – Scans PE/Windows executables to identify potential malware traces
  • Application crash analysis – Allows you to analyse memory content when an application crashes
  • Exe extractor – This module essentially extracts executables from running process/s

The only similar tool I recall is – Malware Analyser v3.0 – A Static & Dynamic Malware Analysis Tool – which is by the same author and I assume is the precursor the more advanced Hook Analyser.

You can download Hook Analyser v3.1 here:

[ Required to fill out a form ]

Or read more here.