Archive | January, 2014

PACK – Password Analysis & Cracking Kit

Your website & network are Hackable


PACK (Password Analysis and Cracking Toolkit) is a collection of utilities developed to aid in analysis of password lists in order to enhance password cracking through pattern detection of masks, rules, character-sets and other password characteristics. The toolkit generates valid input files for Hashcat family of password crackers.

Before using the PACK, you must establish a selection criteria of password lists. Since we are looking to analyze the way people create their passwords, we must obtain as large of a sample of leaked passwords as possible. One such excellent list is based on RockYou.com compromise. This list both provides large and diverse enough collection that provides a good results for common passwords used by similar sites (e.g. social networking). The analysis obtained from this list may not work for organizations with specific password policies. As such, selecting sample input should be as close to your target as possible. In addition, try to avoid obtaining lists based on already cracked passwords as it will generate statistics bias of rules and masks used by individual(s) cracking the list and not actual users.

Please note this tool does not, and is not created to, crack passwords – it just aids the analysis of passwords sets so you can focus your cracking more accurately/efficiently/effectively.

You can download PACK here:

PACK-0.0.4.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Password Cracking

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The 25 Worst Passwords Of 2013 – “password” Is Not #1

Your website & network are Hackable


The worst passwords of 2013 – really, more like the most common. The majority come from the massive Adobe leak, which contributed over 40 million passwords and skewed the data a fair bit pushing “photoshop” and “adobe123” into the list.

Most of them are no surprise though, we published the top 10 most common passwords back in 2006, and although it’s rather UK-centric, it did contain “password”, “123”, “123456”, “letmein”, “qwerty” and for some reason both the old list and this one contain “monkey”.

“123456” is finally getting some time in the spotlight as the world’s worst password, after spending years in the shadow of “password.” Security firm Splashdata, which every year compiles a list of the most common stolen passwords, found that “123456” moved into the number one slot in 2013. Previously, “password” had dominated the rankings.

The change in leadership is largely thanks to Adobe, whose major security breach in October affected upwards of 48 million users. A list of passwords from the Adobe breach had “123456” on top, followed by “123456789” and “password.” The magnitude of the breach had a major impact on Splashdata’s results, explaining why “photoshop” and “adobe123” worked their way onto this year’s list.

Fans of “password” could reasonably petition for an asterisk, however, given that the stolen Adobe passwords included close to 100 million test accounts and inactive accounts. Counting those passwords on the list is kind of like setting a home run record during batting practice. Don’t be surprised if “password” regains the throne in 2014.

It’s amazing to think in this day and age, with the amount of news coverage about hacking that people still use such simplistic passwords. Especially when they are dealing with accounts that have billing information/credit card details.

Plus the proliferation of fairly easy to use password generators and storage tools (KeePass/LastPass/PassPack/1Password etc). I’ve been trying a few of them out lately, and I’m favouring Passpack – although it changed hands lately and development has slowed down for a while.


Weaker passwords are more susceptible to brute-force attacks, where hackers attempt to access accounts through rapid guessing. And when encrypted passwords are stolen, weaker ones are the first to fall to increasingly sophisticated cracking software.

As always, Splashdata suggests avoiding common words and phrases, and says that replacing letters with similar-looking numbers (such as “3” instead of “E) is not an effective strategy. Instead, consider using phrases of random words separated by spaces or underscores, and using different passwords, at least for your most sensitive accounts. Password management programs such as LastPass, KeePass and Splashdata’s own SplashID can also help, as you only have to remember a single master password.

Here are the passwords:

1. 123456
2. password
3. 12345678
4. qwerty
5. abc123
6. 123456789
7. 111111
8. 1234567
9. iloveyou
10. adobe123
11. 123123
12. admin
13. 1234567890
14. letmein
15. photoshop
16. 1234
17. monkey
18. shadow
19. sunshine
20. 12345
21. password1
22. princess
23. azerty
24. trustno1
25. 000000

Source: Network World


Posted in: Password Cracking, Privacy, Web Hacking

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Capstone – Multi-platform, Multi-architecture Disassembly Framework

Your website & network are Hackable


Capstone is a lightweight multi-platform, multi-architecture disassembly framework. The target of the author is to make Capstone the ultimate disassembly engine for binary analysis and reversing in the security community.

It is one of a very few disassembly frameworks that can support multi-architectures. So far, it can handle 4 most important architectures: ARM, ARM64 (aka ARMv8/AArch64), Mips & X86. More will be added in the future when possible.

Implemented in pure C language, Capstone is easy to be adopted for your low-level tool. Furthermore, lightweight & efficient bindings for popular languages such as Python, Ruby, OCaml, C#, Java & Go are also available.

Note that all of our the bindings are all manually coded, since we do not want to rely on bloated SWIG for wrapping.

Features

  • Support hardware architectures: ARM, ARM64 (aka ARMv8), Mips & X86 (more details).
  • Clean/simple/lightweight/intuitive architecture-neutral API.
  • Provide details on disassembled instruction (called “decomposer” by others).
  • Provide some semantics of the disassembled instruction, such as list of implicit registers read & written.
  • Implemented in pure C language, with bindings for Python, Ruby, OCaml, C#, Java and GO available.
  • Native support for Windows & *nix (including MacOSX, Linux, *BSD platforms).
  • Thread-safe by design.
  • Distributed under the open source BSD license.

You can download Capstone source here:

capstone-1.0.tgz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Programming, Security Software

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Yahoo! Spread Bitcoin Mining Botnet Malware Via Ads

Your website & network are Hackable


Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are pretty much headline news every day now, especially with the inflated values (Bitcoin over $1000 recently). We haven’t mentioned them for a long time though, back in 2012 we wrote about Hackers breaking into a Bitcoin Exchange Site called Bitcoinica.

There have been plenty of Bitcoin related hacks since then, mostly targeting exchanges, but there have been some other interesting developments like these so called bitnets, which are basically Bitcoin Mining malware botnets.

The most recent news is that Yahoo! recently served up some adverts which contained malware, the intent of the malware is to create a Bitcoin mining botnet.

Yahoo confirmed that for a four-day period in January, malware was served in ads on its homepage. Experts estimate that as many as two million European users could have been hit. Security firm Light Cyber said the malware was intended to create a huge network of Bitcoin mining machines.

“The malware writers put a lot of effort into making it as efficient as possible to utilise the computing power in the best way,” Light Cyber’s founder Giora Engel told the BBC.

Bitcoin mining malware is designed to steal computing power to make it easier for criminals to accumulate the virtual currency with little effort on their part.

“Generating bitcoins is basically guessing numbers,” said Amichai Shulman, chief technology office of security firm Imperva. “The first one to guess the right number gets 25 bitcoins and if you have a large volume of computers guessing in a co-ordinated way then you have a more efficient way of making money,” he added.

Other than a computer running slower, victims will be unaware that their machine is being used in what could become known as a “bitnet”. It is a variation on the traditional botnet, networks of malware-infected computers used to churn out spam or bombard websites with requests in order to knock them offline. Some experts estimate that such networks could be generating as much as $100,000 (£60,000) each day.

If the estimates are true, then whoever wrote this malware and managed to get it onto the Yahoo! frontpage could be minting money – $100,000 a day! That’s 3 million bucks a month, certainly no chump change.

I’d be interested to know more though, as CPU mining for Bitcoin is incredibly inefficient – so I wonder if this malware also harnesses GPU minining – which whilst can’t be compared to ASICS miners – still has a decent amount of grunt.


Yahoo acknowledged the attack in a statement earlier this week.

“From December 31 to January 3 on our European sites, we served some advertisements that did not meet our editorial guidelines – specifically, they spread malware,” the statement read.

It went on to say that users in America, Asia and Latin America weren’t affected but did not specify how many European users were victims. Fox IT, the Dutch cybersecurity firm which revealed the malware attack, estimates that there were around 27,000 infections every hour the malware was live on the site. Over the period of the attack that could mean as many as two million machines were infected. Such attacks may be hard to avoid, said Mr Shulman.

“For an ad platform it is virtually impossible to guarantee 100% malware free ads. There are many independent stakeholders involved in the process of web advertising, so from time to time any ad platform is bound to deliver malware.”

It’s a pretty scary thought that no ad platform can be malware free, but honestly I’ve never experienced Google Adsense serving any kind of malware – although when I’m browsing on mobile lately I’ve had a lot of sides trying to push random .apk files to me.

It seems to like it was only regional as well with European users being targeted (perhaps due to the advert geo-targeting) – but with up to 2 million people infected – that’s a fairly decent sized Bitcoin mining botnet.

Source: BBC News


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xssless – An Automated XSS Payload Generator Written In Python

Find your website's Achilles' Heel


xssless is an automated XSS payload generator written in python.

Usage

  1. Record request(s) with Burp proxy
  2. Select request(s) you want to generate, then right click and select “Save items”
  3. Use xssless to generate your payload: ./xssless.py burp_export_file
  4. Pwn!

Features

  • Automated XSS payload generation from imported Burp proxy requests
  • Payloads are 100% asynchronous and won’t freeze the user’s browser
  • CSRF tokens can be easily extracted and set via the -p option
  • POST multipart is supported, along with XSS file uploading via the -f option
  • Payloads are dynamic and portable (due to relative URLs)
  • Crazy JavaScript worms with no hassle!

Installation/Download

Download the latest xssless:

Install dependencies:

Run the script:

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Web Hacking

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