Archive | June, 2011

Groupon India Subsidiary Leaks 300,000 Plain Text User Passwords

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Oh look! Another data-leak, this was was pretty bad as it contained plain-text passwords (who on earth doesn’t hash their passwords in the DB in 2011?!).

Anyway this time it was a Groupon subsidary – Sosata.com which managed to leak the e-mail addresses and plain-text passwords for 300,000 users AND on top of that, Google managed to index it.

The original story was published here:

Groupon leaks entire Indian user database

The leak was discovered by Australian security consultant Daniel Grzelak.

Groupon subsidiary Sosasta.com accidentally published a database containing the email addresses and clear-text passwords of 300,000 users and the cache was indexed by Google.

The trove of personal data was discovered by Australian security consultant Daniel Grzelak as he plugged a handful of query terms into the search engine, he said Tuesday. He contacted Patrick Gray with security blog Risky Biz, which reported that the SQL database contained the details for 300,000 Sosasta account holders.

A Groupon spokesman confirmed that the digital coupon distributor “was alerted to a security issue” on Thursday night and corrected the problem immediately. The issue was limited to Sosasta, which uses its own servers and network and isn’t connected to Groupon’s systems in other countries.

“We have begun notifying our subscribers and advising them to change their Sosasta passwords as soon as possible,” the spokesman said in a statement. “We will keep our Indian subscribers fully informed as we learn more.”

At least this time it seems like someone messed up rather than a hack by LulzSec or Anonymous. And it’s good to see an organization react quickly and responsibly to such an information disclosure, this is sadly a rather rare attribute.

The issue was limited to Sosata and did not effect any Groupon sites in other countries. Sosata users have been notified to change their passwords in the system, and I hope for their sakes not too much password re-use is going on.

I still don’t see the fact that the passwords were un-hashed being addressed anywhere though, doesn’t that concern anyone other than me?


At time of writing, there was no advisory on either the Groupon or Sosasta websites, although Sosasta’s Facebook page contained a notice that came in the form of a JPG image that couldn’t easily be indexed by Google or other search engines. Ah the irony.

According to Risky Biz, Grzelak found the massive cache as he was looking for additions to shouldichangemypassword.com, a side project that indexes email addresses included in more than a dozen high-profile privacy breaches carried out by LulzSec and other hacking groups. The query that hit pay dirt included the terms “filetype:sql” “password” and “gmail.”

“I started scrolling, and scrolling and I couldn’t get to the bottom of the file,” Grzelak told Risky Biz. “Then I realised how big it actually was.”

The Groupon statement didn’t say why passwords weren’t encrypted or why such a sensitive file was publicly available.

The snafu is the latest to expose the folly of using the same password on more than one site, a practice still followed by a shockingly high number of people. If you’re one of them, you ought to consider using a password-management program such as Password Safe or KeePass.

For developers – http auth/password protected directories are good! Hashing passwords is good! Leaking sensitive info is BAD!

Sincerely I doubt anyone reading this site re-uses simplistic passwords for their online accounts – but just in case you do – or know anyone that does – I do recommend using Password Safe or KeePass anyway, keep that shizzle secure yo!

Anyway, I wonder if anyone is going to sue over this?

Source: The Register


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Metasploitable – Test Your Metasploit Against A Vulnerable Host

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Ok so you’ve got Metasploit loaded up, you’ve read the Metasploit Tutorials & Watched the Videos – but you’ve still got no idea what to do next and don’t have anything to test against.

It’s not exactly new, but I guess a lot of people still don’t know about it. Basically if you don’t know what to do next, this is where Metasploitable comes in! One of the questions that the Metasploit developers often hear is “What systems can I use to test against?” Based on this, they thought it would be a good idea throw together an exploitable VM that you can use for testing purposes.

Metasploitable is an Ubuntu 8.04 server install on a VMWare 6.5 image. A number of vulnerable packages are included, including an install of tomcat 5.5 (with weak credentials), distcc, tikiwiki, twiki, and an older MySQL.

You can use most VMware products to run it, and you’ll want to make sure it’s configured for Host-only networking unless it’s in your lab – no need to throw another vulnerable machine on the corporate network. It’s configured in non-persistent-disk mode, so you can simply reset it if you accidentally ‘rm -rf’ it.

There are various other similar setups you can test out your hacking kung-fu on like:

You can download Metasploitable here:

Torrent – Metasploitable.zip.torrent
(Be careful opening the readme.txt as there are spoilers in it).

Or read more here.


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Programming, Web Hacking

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Last Chance To Get 10% Off Penetration Testing – Student Course

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A couple of weeks back we posted about the new course suited to beginners by eLearnSecurity – we also offered an exclusive 10% Discount for Darknet readers – Penetration Testing – Student Course/Training by eLearnSecurity (Get 10% Off Until June 30th!).

eLearnSecurity - Penetration Testing - Student Course


This is just a reminder that this offer expires in THREE days on June 30th. So you need to grab it now!

COUPON CODE: DARK-ELS-10

You can buy the course now here.


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ksymhunter – Routines For Hunting Down Kernel Symbols

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Routines for hunting down kernel symbols from from kallsyms, System.map, vmlinux, vmlinuz, and remote symbol servers.

Examples:

And..

You can download ksymhunter v1.0 here:

ksymhunter.tar.gz

Or read more here.


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Hackers Exploiting Latest Adobe Flash Bug On Large Scale

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It’s very out of character for Adobe – but they’ve actually released two out of band patches in the last week or so.

They’ve had to patch 4 times in the past 2 months – that’s a total of 6 times in 2011 so far – with 5 out of those 6 being for critical bugs.

It seems like Flash has become a major target for hackers in the past 6 months or so, despite the fact that Adobe has worked with Google to sandbox Flash in the Chrome browser.

Hackers are aggressively exploiting a just-patched Flash vulnerability, serving attack code “on a fairly large scale” from compromised sites as well as from their own malicious domains, a security researcher said Friday. The attacks exploit the critical Flash Player bug that Adobe patched June 14 with its second “out-of-band,” or emergency update, in nine days.

“CVE-2011-2110 is being exploited in the wild on a fairly large scale,” said Steven Adair, a researcher with the Shadowserver Foundation, a volunteer-run group that tracks vulnerabilities and botnets. “In particular this exploit is showing up as a drive-by in several legitimate websites, including those belonging to various NGOs [non-government organizations], aerospace companies, a Korean news site, an Indian government Web site, and a Taiwanese university.”

CVE-2011-2110 is the identifier for the Flash vulnerability assigned by the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures database. Attackers are also using the exploit in “spear phishing” attacks aimed at specific individuals, said Adair on the Shadowserver site. Adair called the attacks “nasty” because the exploit “happens seamlessly in the background,” giving victims no clue that their systems have been compromised.

The CVE ID for this vulnerability is – CVE-2011-2110 with the NVD listing stating:

Adobe Flash Player before 10.3.181.26 on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and Solaris, and 10.3.185.23 and earlier on Android, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (memory corruption) via unspecified vectors, as exploited in the wild in June 2011.

Sounds pretty nasty, at least the patch is out for it – but as usual, how many people will apply it in a timely fashion?


When Adobe patched the vulnerability last week, it conceded that exploits were already in use.

Adair also said there’s been an increase in Flash-based attacks. “There has been an ongoing assault against Flash Player for several years now, but especially so in the last three months,” Adair said.

Adobe has patched Flash Player four times in the last two months, and six times so far this year. Of the six updates, five addressed “zero-day” bugs that attackers were already exploiting at the time the patches were issued.

Brad Arkin, Adobe’s director of product security and privacy, acknowledged the problems in keeping ahead of attackers, but blamed the popularity of Flash Player for the attention.

“The installed base [of Flash Player] is a real big part of it,” said Arkin. “It’s such a widely distributed technology that attackers find it worthwhile to invest the time to carry out some kind of malicious activity. They’re making an investment for the biggest return possible.”

Arkin also argued that attackers get more bang for their buck by rooting out Flash vulnerabilities than they do looking for bugs in individual browsers because virtually every personal computer has the Flash plug-in installed. “Flash is the code [used in the browser] that has the highest market penetration,” he said.

According to Adair, the exploit of CVE-2011-2110 has been in use since June 9, five days before Adobe issued its latest security update. Arkin corroborated that timeline.

Adobe does claim to be more pro-active about patching than Microsoft – which honestly isn’t really hard is it? Brad Arkin the head of security said:

I think we’re more aggressive than Microsoft, basically, if we have information about attacks in the wild, or if the information is out there on a mailing list — which means attacks are imminent — that tends to be a trigger for us to think about an out-of-band.

Do note they said ‘think’ about a patch though and not ‘issue’ one.

Source: Network World


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Zed Attack Proxy – ZAProxy v1.3.0 Released – Integrated Penetration Testing Tool

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


It’s been a while since the last time we wrote about the OWASP ZAP – Zed Attack Proxy for Web Application Penetration Testing, back in October 2010.

ZAP is an easy to use integrated penetration testing tool for finding vulnerabilities in web applications. It is designed to be used by people with a wide range of security experience and as such is ideal for developers and functional testers who are new to penetration testing.

ZAP provides automated scanners as well as a set of tools that allow you to find security vulnerabilities manually.

Main Features

  • Intercepting Proxy
  • Automated scanner
  • Passive scanner
  • Brute Force scanner
  • Spider
  • Fuzzer
  • Port scanner
  • Dynamic SSL certificates
  • API
  • Beanshell integration

What’s New?

A new version has been released, v1.3.0, the release adds the following main features:

  • Fuzzing, using the JBroFuzz library
  • Dynamic SSL Certificates
  • Daemon mode and API
  • BeanShell integration
  • Full internationalization
  • Out of the box support for 10 languages

You can download ZAP v1.3.0 here:

Windows Installer – ZAP_1.3.0_Windows.exe
Linux Installer – ZAP_1.3.0_Linux.tar.gz
Mac OSX Installer – ZAP_1.3.0_Mac_OS_X.zip

Or read more here.


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Malaysia Government Sites Under Attack From Anonymous

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


The big news in Asia this week is that Anonymous has found a new target – the Malaysian government. Recently the Internet regulator in Malaysia (SKMM) issued a notice to all the ISPs in the South-East Asian country to block 10 domains associated with copyright infringement.

Following that, Anonymous released a manifesto against the Malaysian government to protest against the Internet censorship and to educate the Malaysian users how to circumvent the blocking measures.

Malaysia’s Communications and Multimedia Commission said that 51 websites in the .gov.my domain were attacked beginning late Wednesday, and that 41 of the sites suffered various levels of disruption.

The MCMC, the country’s Internet and telecommunications regulator, did not however provide information on the nature of the attacks, or the people behind it, describing them only as “unknown hackers”.

However, it made references to some of the websites recovering quickly, suggesting that these sites faced a DDoS or distributed denial-of-service attack rather than a hack.

DDoS attacks can make a website inaccessible to users by swamping the website with traffic from hundreds or thousands of computers.

Such attacks are a known tactic of Anonymous, a hacker group that had threatened to attack Malaysia.

Apparently 51 sites have seen hacking attempts and 41 have been effected and/or disrupted in some way. Some sites went down way before the promised ‘deadline’ and there has been a lot of data posted online (user-names, e-mails, account details, hashed passwords and so on).

The news is flying around the globe with all the big players reporting on it. There are various accounts of what has happened, the motivations behind and of course all kinds of conspiracy theories are flying around.

We’ll have to wait for more ‘official’ news to come out from the Malaysian Government (not that we can really trust that either).


The MCMC had noticed a reduction in the levels of attack by 4 a.m. local time Thursday, it said. The attacks had little effect on Malaysian users, and most of the websites have already recovered, it said.

“We do not expect the overall recovery to these websites to take long,” it said.

“The public is advised to report any information they may have regarding the identity of these hackers as the act to disrupt network services is a serious offence,” it said.

Anonymous has used various online forums to threaten Malaysia with an attack in protest against the government’s decision to block 10 websites that reportedly allowed the download of pirated content. Earlier this week, Anonymous invited people to join Operation Malaysia, targeting a government website from 7.30 p.m. GMT on Wednesday (3.30 a.m. Thursday, local time).

Interestingly enough the ‘official’ Anonymous Twitter and Blog accounts have seen no mentions of Malaysia – only Turkey, Spain and the Federal reserve.

Other reports on this:

Hopefully this will force the Malaysian Government to buck up their cyber security initiative and make sure all the government agencies have secure and up to date web software.

A lot of them are running woefully outdated versions of CMS platforms like Joomla and Drupal.

Source: Network World


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Skipfish 1.94b Released – Active Web Application Security Reconnaissance Tool

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It’s been a while since we last mentioned Skipfish, it was back in March 2010 when they first came out.

Skipfish is an active web application security reconnaissance tool. It prepares an interactive sitemap for the targeted site by carrying out a recursive crawl and dictionary-based probes. The resulting map is then annotated with the output from a number of active (but hopefully non-disruptive) security checks. The final report generated by the tool is meant to serve as a foundation for professional web application security assessments.

A number of commercial and open source tools with analogous functionality is readily available (e.g., Nikto, Websecurify, Netsparker, w3af, Arachni); stick to the one that suits you best. That said, skipfish tries to address some of the common problems associated with web security scanners.

Specific advantages include:

  • High speed: pure C code, highly optimized HTTP handling, minimal CPU footprint – easily achieving 2000 requests per second with responsive targets.
  • Ease of use: heuristics to support a variety of quirky web frameworks and mixed-technology sites, with automatic learning capabilities, on-the-fly wordlist creation, and form autocompletion.
  • Cutting-edge security logic: high quality, low false positive, differential security checks, capable of spotting a range of subtle flaws, including blind injection vectors.

Some users had a problem getting it running, it does have a dependency – assuming you are on a Debian based distro, all you need to do is:

The minum syntax required to run the tool would be:

That should be enough to get you started!

It’s a pretty powerful tool and likely to pick up issues that Nessus or Nikto might miss.

You can download Skipfish 1.94b here:

skipfish-1.94b.tgz

Or read more here.


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IMF (International Monetary Fund) Suffer Major Breach In Sophisticated Cyberattack

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Oh dear, another big organization has fallen foul to the whole RSA SecurID hack – it seems that way anyway. In combination with a Spear Phishing attack (similar to the one carried out on high level US officials via Gmail recently) hackers have busted the IMF wide open.

It seems to be a very targeted attack and most likely uses multiple attack vectors rolled into one. The IMF has had to severe network connections with the World Bank as a precaution against further damage. Although they say it’s not linked to RSA SecurID – how can we be sure really?

The main problem with this situation? The IMF hold some EXTREMELY sensitive information about all kinds of nations and their economies.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has reportedly become the target of a concerted hack attack.

The resulting breach was severe enough for the economic development agency to temporarily suspend network connections with the World Bank, as a precaution. The link was quickly restored.

According to internal emails leaked to Bloomberg the precautionary disconnection followed the detection of “suspicious file transfers”. “[A] subsequent investigation established that a Fund desktop computer had been compromised and used to access some Fund systems. At this point, we have no reason to believe that any personal information was sought for fraud purposes.”

The IMF reported told staff on or around 8 June that it planned to replace RSA SecurID tokens used for remote authentication. RSA last week publicly offered to replace two factor authentication token after defence contractor Lockheed Martin said it had come under attack from hackers using information gleaned from an earlier high-profile attack on RSA back in March.

However an IMF staffer told the New York Times that the attack on its systems is not linked to the earlier RSA breach. Unconfirmed reports suggest that the IMF was the target of a spear phishing attack designed to plant malware inside its systems.

And the info about it not being linked to RSA SecurID comes from someone who actually works at the IMF, so it should be fairly legitimate info.

As per usual, in these kinds of situations – the IMF isn’t really saying a whole lot about what’s going on – unsurprisingly so. What we do know though is a senior official has stated that it was a “very major breach”.

It wouldn’t surprise me as well if they did get owned by a very accurate, targeted and personalized phishing attack.


If so – and it’s a big if – then the IMF has come under the type of attack previously faced by both a French economics ministry and its Canadian counterpart over recent months. Both the Canadian and French hack coincided with international government leader conferences.

The IMF itself is saying little about the attack other than to confirm that it is under investigation. The motives, much less the identity of attackers, remain unclear.

David Beesley, managing director of security consultancy Network Defence, said that targeted (spear phishing) attacks of the type that might have been launched can be very tricky but not impossible to thwart.

“Spear phishing is difficult to defend against because it primarily targets users not PCs, and the information that attackers can gather from social networking sites makes the phishing emails look very convincing,” Beesley said. “As we’ve seen, it makes these attacks effective against any size of organisation.”

“Really, firms need to use a mix of user education and layered security solutions to defend themselves. Employees should be aware that even plausible-looking emails should be treated with suspicion, and IT teams should look at their AV and anti-spam solutions to try and stop malware propagating,” he added.

So far we don’t know what the hackers were able to access and where the attack originated from (geographically speaking).

And well, it’s extremely unlikely they are going to publish details – because well that just doesn’t happen does it?

We’ll keep our ears to the ground anyway and see if anything else comes to the surface.

Source: The Register


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, General Hacking, Legal Issues

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Penetration Testing – Student Course/Training by eLearnSecurity

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Introduction

You may remember a while back we reviewed the Penetration Testing – Pro course by eLearnSecurity here – eLearnSecurity – Online Penetration Testing Training and we posted about the course update here – Penetration Testing Course Pro 1.1 – New Version & New Module.

The latest news is they’ve come out with a truly entry level course for ABSOLUTE beginners called Penetration Testing – Student.

It’s basically the definitive online penetration testing training course for beginners. It’s for all those people who e-mail me with no idea where to start, it’s priced competitively and it’s really meant for something starting out fresh.

eLearnSecurity

I think it’s a great initiative as the hardest part of getting into any industry is the very first part, when you don’t even know what you are supposed to be looking for and you can’t start searching because you don’t know the right terms or have the right keywords.

This Penetration Testing – Student caters for that audience, and if you are really serious you can even buy it together in a package with the Penetration Testing – Pro course for only $799USD.

The Course

At a glance, this is what you’ll get from the course:

  • Learn preliminary skills
  • Learn modern hacking techniques
  • Understand how penetration testers work
  • Test your skills with engaging quizzes
  • Practice your skills with exercises
  • Learn how to use the best tools
  • 14 Video lessons
  • Dedicated forums
  • 500+ interactive slides
  • Easy to follow: Audio narrations, videos and animations

The course itself is rather different to the normal, formal module based training materials we are used to seeing. It just has two basic paths, one which teaches you about stuff like networking and web app basics – this path is titled preliminary skills. The other branch covers penetration testing, but it’s more of a narrative than straight forward module based approach.

Penetration Testing - Student - Branches

So rather than having a module for information gathering, then one for footprinting/scanning and so on – you follow along the process of a penetration test by step. One of the interesting parts is once you have accomplished the reconnaissance/info gathering part you will be presented with the remote network as it was uncovered in the previous stages as seen here:

Penetration Testing - Student

At this point you can actually click on whichever workstation or server you want to attack and you will then learn the associated techniques, for example I clicked on the Web Server and was presented with this:

Penetration Testing - Student

It makes the whole learning process a lot more interactive and keeps it interesting rather than the traditional method with modules and slides – which can get a little dry. Especially for a subject like Penetration Testing where you need to cover so many different topics, tools and techniques.

The courseware itself is very in-depth and I feel it does move slow enough for a beginner to take everything. Of course to get the most out of it (as with any form of studying) anyone taking this course will have to do some learning/searching/research/reading on their own.


Other stuff included is 14 small self assessment quizzes at the end of every chapter and a simple lab to get familiar with some tools – it’s using BackTrack and Metasploitable.

Penetration Testing - Student - Lab Setup

Features wise you can work at your own pace and the software remembers what section/slide you were on so you can resume where you left off. Students can also get access to the eLearnSecurity Coliseum web app hacking lab where they can practice web app hacking topics, when it is released (which should be very soon!).

Conclusion

So overall, what’s the conclusion? I think if you are just starting out, perhaps still studying at University or College this is a great place to start. It’ll get your basics up to scratch and start you out without bombarding you with jargon and technical terms.

If you are already pen-testing, or interning or doing any kind of technical stuff – this isn’t really the course for you. I’d suggest you look at the Penetration Testing – Pro course.

This course will get you up to speed on the basics of networking, the tools available, web applications, web application security and the whole process of pen-testing.

If you are really interested I suggest you sign up now, as a reader of Darknet we are offering you 10% off the course.

Buy the course now!

Please note – this coupon will only work until the end of June (June 30th) – so don’t hang around!

For a demo/free module you can sign-up here:

Penetration Testing – Student Demo

There’s more info here:

Penetration Testing Training Course for Beginners

And you can find the full syllabus for the course here:

Penetration Testing – Student Syllabus [PDF]


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