Archive | April, 2010

PBNJ – Network Architecture Monitoring Tool

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


PBNJ is a suite of tools to monitor changes on a network over time. It does this by checking for changes on the target machine(s), which includes the details about the services running on them as well as the service state. PBNJ parses the data from a scan and stores it in a database. PBNJ uses Nmap to perform scans.

What does PBNJ do?

Depending on what you need, PBNJ can do various things. It is able to give a layout of a class network. It can also be run as an automated scanning tool parsing the data to CSV format files and growing an in-depth view of a network over time.

  • Automated Internal/External Scans
  • Flexible Querying/Alerting System
  • Parsing Nmap XML results
  • Easy access to Nmap’s data in a database (SQLite, MySQL or Postgres)
  • Distributed Scanning Consoles and Engines
  • Runs on Linux, BSD and Windows
  • Packaged for Debian, FreeBSD, Gentoo, Backtrack and nUbuntu

You can download PBNJ here:

pbnj-2.04.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Countermeasures, Network Hacking, Security Software

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Countermeasures, Network Hacking, Security Software | Add a Comment
Recent in Countermeasures:
- Google Rapid Response (GRR ) – Remote Live Forensics For Incident Response
- PEiD – Detect PE Packers, Cryptors & Compilers
- NAXSI – Open-Source WAF For Nginx

Related Posts:

Most Read in Countermeasures:
- AJAX: Is your application secure enough? - 120,031 views
- Password Hasher Firefox Extension - 117,718 views
- NDR or Backscatter Spam – How Non Delivery Reports Become a Nuisance - 57,707 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


Hackers Penetrate Apache.org In Direct Targeted Attack

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


This is not the first time Apache.org has been hacked, it was comprised back in September 2009 using SSH keys.

This time another targeted attack against the site was successful and allowed the attackers to capture the passwords of users logging into the bug-tracking service. It also exposed the entire password list, which sadly although hashed was salted with a static salt rather than a random one..so it’s vulnerable to brute-forcing.

I’d say a good set of Rainbow Tables would make short work of it.

Hackers penetrated the heavily-fortified servers for Apache.org in a “direct, targeted attack” that captured the passwords of anyone who used the website’s bug-tracking service over a three-day span last week.

The breach, the second to hit Apache.org in eight months, also exposed a much larger list of passwords belonging to people who accessed the site’s bug-tracking section. While the databases used a one-way hash to disguise the passwords, two of the lists are vulnerable to dictionary attacks because Atlassian, the maker of issue-tracking software used by Apache, failed to add “random salt” to them.

As a result, Apache officials said users who logged in to the bug section of the website from April 6 to April 9 “should consider the password as compromised, because the attackers changed the login form to log them.” They also warned that there’s a high risk of compromise to other users if they employed simple passwords based on dictionary words.

If you are a user of Apache.org and the bug tracker in particular and you logged in between April 6th and April 9th, you should consider your password comprised. That means change your password and if you use the same password anywhere else, change those too.

Personally if I had a login there I’d change my password regardless, because given enough time and processing power most of the hashed passwords can be cracked.

I think Apache.org should mandate a forceful password change for all accounts in the system for security reasons, I don’t think anyone would complain.

The intrusion began on April 5 when unknown attackers using a hacked server from Slicehost opened a new bug report on Apache.org. The post contained a shortened web link from tinyurl.com that exploited an XSS, or cross-site scripting, vulnerability on Apache’s support website.

The hole was the result of a bug in JIRA, the issue-tracking software made by a company called Atlassian. The exploit was designed to steal session cookies used to authenticate people logged in to Apache’s JIRA system. When several Apache administrators following the fraudulent bug report clicked on the on the malicious link, their JIRA administrator rights were then compromised.

The attackers also carried out a brute-force attack that flooded the site with hundreds of thousands of password combinations. By April 6, one of the two methods allowed the attackers to gain full administrative rights on the JIRA system. For three days, the hackers used their powers to copy users’ home directories and files and to install a program that logged the passwords of anyone accessing the system.

The initial attack vector was an XSS against the admins of the bug-tracking software which enabled the attackers to compromise their accounts and get further access to the system.

The full postmortem from the Apache team is here:

apache.org incident report for 04/09/2010

The same virtual host also attacked Atlassian directly and comprised their customer accounts.

Source: The Register


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, General Hacking, Privacy

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, General Hacking, Privacy | Add a Comment
Recent in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- BeautifulPeople.com Leak Exposes 1.1M Extremely Private Records
- Apple Will Not Patch Windows QuickTime Vulnerabilities
- BADLOCK – Are ‘Branded’ Exploits Going Too Far?

Related Posts:

Most Read in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- Learn to use Metasploit – Tutorials, Docs & Videos - 234,359 views
- AJAX: Is your application secure enough? - 120,031 views
- eEye Launches 0-Day Exploit Tracker - 85,486 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


x5s – Automated XSS Security Testing Assistant

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


x5s is a Fiddler add-on which aims to assist penetration testers in finding cross-site scripting vulnerabilities. It’s main goal is to help you identify the hotspots where XSS might occur by:

  • Detecting where safe encodings were not applied to emitted user-inputs
  • Detecting where Unicode character transformations might bypass security filters
  • Detecting where non-shortest UTF-8 encodings might bypass security filters

It injects ASCII to find traditional encoding issues, and it injects special Unicode characters and encodings to help an analyst identify where XSS filters might be bypassed. The approach to finding these hotspots involves injecting single-character probes separately into each input field of each request, and detecting how they were later emitted. The focus is on reflected XSS issues however persisted issues can also be detected.

The idea of injecting special Unicode characters and non-shortest form encodings was to identify where transformations occur which could be used to bypass security filters. This also has the interesting side effect of illuminating how all of the fields in a Web-app handle Unicode. For example, in a single page with many inputs, you may end up seeing the same test case get returned in a variety of ways – URL encoded, NCR encoded, ill-encoded, raw, replaced, dropped, etc. In some cases where we’ve had Watcher running in conjunction, we’ve been able to detect ill-formed UTF-8 byte sequences which is indicative of ‘other’ problems.

x5s acts as an assistant to the security tester by speeding up the process of parameter manipulation and aggregating the results for quick viewing. It automates some of the preliminary XSS testing work by enumerating and injecting canaries into all input fields/parameters sent to an application and analyzing how those canaries were later emitted. E.g. Was the emitted output encoded safely or not? Did an injected character transform to something else?

x5s does not inject XSS payloads – it does not attempt to exploit or confirm an XSS vulnerability. It’s designed to draw your attention to the fields and parameters which seem likely candidates for vulnerability. A security-tester would review the results to find issues where special characters were dangerously transformed or emitted without a safe encoding. This can be done by quickly scanning the results, which have been designed with the intention of providing quick visual inspection. Results filters are also included so the tester could simply click show hotspots to see only the potential problem areas. After identifying a hotspot it’s the tester’s job to perform further validation and XSS testing.

The types of test cases that x5s includes:

  1. Traditional test cases – characters typically used to test for XSS injection such as <, >, “,and ‘ which are used to control HTML, CSS, or javascript;
  2. Transformable test cases – characters that might uppercase, lowercase, Normalize, best-fit map, or other wise transform to completely different characters, E.g. the Turkish ‘İ’ which will lower-case to ‘i’ in culture-aware software.
  3. Overlong UTF-8 test cases – non-shortest UTF-8 encodings of the ‘traditional’ test cases noted above. E.g. the ASCII < is 0x3C normally and 0xC0 0xBC in non-shortest form UTF-8.

You can download x5s here:

x5s v1.0.0 beta

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Web Hacking

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Web Hacking | Add a Comment
Recent in Hacking Tools:
- SubBrute – Subdomain Brute-forcing Tool
- The Backdoor Factory (BDF) – Patch Binaries With Shellcode
- Gdog – Python Windows Backdoor With Gmail Command & Control

Related Posts:

Most Read in Hacking Tools:
- Top 15 Security/Hacking Tools & Utilities - 1,973,486 views
- Brutus Password Cracker – Download brutus-aet2.zip AET2 - 1,401,446 views
- wwwhack 1.9 – Download wwwhack19.zip Web Hacking Tool - 676,050 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


Serious Java Bug Exposes Users To Code Execution

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


Once again a different attack vector, seems to the creative season for discovering bugs. I guess it’s partially due to the fact this time of year tends to be pretty quiet business wise so researchers have plenty of downtime to look at nifty ways to break things.

This might be a tough one to solve as it’s not a typical buffer overflow or programming bug per-se but more of a flaw in the way the Java Virtual Machine functions. Sun don’t consider this vulnerability to be critical, which could be a mistake on their part as that means it won’t be patched until the next patch in the cycle is released – which should be around July.

A Google researcher has published details of a Java virtual machine bug that could be used to run unauthorized programs on a computer.

The attack was disclosed Friday by Google’s Tavis Ormandy, who said he had notified Oracle’s Sun team about the flaw earlier. “They informed me that they do not consider this vulnerability to be of high enough priority to break their quarterly patch cycle,” Ormandy wrote. “I did not agree.” Oracle declined to comment on the issue. The company just released a major Java update last week and its next set of patches is due in July.

The attack could give hackers a way to run unauthorized Java programs on a victim’s machine. They can do this because Java allows developers to tell the Java virtual machine to install alternate Java libraries. By creating a malicious library and then telling the JVM to install it, an attacker could run his malicious program.

The attack was actually disclosed by a Google employee, in some articles it stated he did not wish for his company name to be disclosed but it was anyway in this article at least.

It works in a fairly roundabout way by leveraging on the fact Java allows developers to run libraries using the JVM, by installing an alternate malicious library an attacker could compromise the machine.

Oracle is making a mistake, not patching the bug immediately, said Marc Maiffret, chief security architect with FireEye, via instant message.

The bug is particularly nasty because it’s due to a design flaw in Java, rather than the type of programming error that would lead to a more common buffer-overflow attack. “It is a neat bug,” he said.

However, Java-based attacks are still rare, and rather than developing a brand-new type of attack, criminals are more likely to spend their time using known vectors such as the browser or Adobe Reader, said Russ Cooper, a senior information security analyst with Verizon Business.

“Java has not been exploited to any extent that should worry the average consumer, heck, or business for that matter,” he said via instant message.

Risk wise however, I’d have to agree it’s not particularly high as historically Java attacks aren’t really common and attackers will play the numbers game attacking whatever will yield the most infections.

The flaw affects all versions since Java SE 6 update 10 for Microsoft Windows and could possibly effect Linux users – but that hasn’t been verified yet.

More via The Reg here – Critical Java Vulnerability

Source: Network World


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Programming, Web Hacking

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Programming, Web Hacking | Add a Comment
Recent in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- BeautifulPeople.com Leak Exposes 1.1M Extremely Private Records
- Apple Will Not Patch Windows QuickTime Vulnerabilities
- BADLOCK – Are ‘Branded’ Exploits Going Too Far?

Related Posts:

Most Read in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- Learn to use Metasploit – Tutorials, Docs & Videos - 234,359 views
- AJAX: Is your application secure enough? - 120,031 views
- eEye Launches 0-Day Exploit Tracker - 85,486 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


StreamArmor – Discover & Remove Alternate Data Streams (ADS)

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


StreamArmor is a tool for discovering hidden alternate data streams (ADS) and can also clean them completely from the system. It’s advanced auto analysis coupled with online threat verification mechanism makes it the best tool available in the market for eradicating the evil streams. StreamArmor comes with fast multi threaded ADS scanner which can recursively scan over entire system and quickly uncover all hidden streams. All such discovered streams are represented using specific color patten based on threat level which makes it easy for human eye to distinguish between suspicious and normal streams.

StreamArmor has built-in advanced file type detection mechanism which examines the content of file to accurately detect the file type of stream. This makes it great tool in forensic analysis in uncovering hidden documents/images/audio/video/database/archive files within the alternate data streams. StreamArmor is the standalone, portable application which does not require any installation. It can be copied to any place in the system and executed directly.

What are ADS (Alternate Data Streams)?

If you’ve had any experience with advanced malware or Windows forensics you’d already know what ADS are, but if you haven’t is a lesser known feature of the Windows NTFS file system which provides the ability to put data into existing files and folders without affecting their functionality and size. Any such stream associated with file/folder is not visible when viewed through conventional utilities such as Windows Explorer or DIR command or any other file browser tools.

If so inclined you can read more here:

Platform

Windows XP, 2K3, Vista, Longhorn and Windows 7 (both 32 & 64 bit versions) On 64 bit platform, only 32 bit processes are supported.

You can download StreamArmor v1.0 here:

StreamArmor_v1.zip

Or read more here.


Posted in: Forensics, Malware, Windows Hacking

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Forensics, Malware, Windows Hacking | Add a Comment
Recent in Forensics:
- Google Rapid Response (GRR ) – Remote Live Forensics For Incident Response
- FastIR Collector – Windows Incident Response Tool
- Rekall – Memory Forensic Framework

Related Posts:

Most Read in Forensics:
- NetworkMiner – Passive Sniffer & Packet Analysis Tool for Windows - 66,373 views
- raw2vmdk – Mount Raw Hard Disk (dd) Images As VMDK Virtual Disks - 34,105 views
- OpenDLP – Free & Open-Source Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Tool - 28,219 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


The New Look Darknet & A New VPS

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


If you’ve been reading regularly you would have probably noticed unavailability or extreme loading times during March. Anyway, it was about time I updated the look of the site and the functionality needed implementing properly so I took the change to put up a new theme and fix any inefficient parts of the old setup. So the server problems (and horribly slow handling of the problems by the ‘managed VPS’ company) led me to change server and pushed me to update the theme with a newer one that suites the latest version of WordPress better.

I had been using that dear old Tonus theme since 2004, it was getting a little worn around the edges.

Darknet 2009

And well here we are, April 2010 a new look for Darknet. A wider column, more modern look and larger text for my old eyes. Layout wise I tried to keep as similar to the old layout as possible so people didn’t get lost, and well the layout was fine I think.

Anyway I’m gonna leave it for a few days without updating and I hope there is no bugs. New server is likely to be faster for most people (but sadly is slower for me over here in Asia).

I looked around for quite a while and found the top 3 managed VPS providers to be KnownHost, WiredTree and ServInt.

In the end ServInt seemed to be the best option, having been around the longest and having some customer testimonials from people who have been with them 6 years! Now that is impressive, plus they give a little hardware for the buck.

Feature wise, not much different – main thing is the site now supports threaded comments so you can reply to each other properly and I can reply to you.

If you spot anything wrong/any bugs/mistakes/odd looking tidbits or general nonsense do drop me a line and let me know.

DNS is a funny thing so you might alternate between seeing the old site and the new site for a couple of days.


Posted in: Site News

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Site News | Add a Comment
Recent in Site News:
- A Look Back At 2015 – Tools & News Highlights
- A Look Back At 2014 – Tools & News Highlights
- Yes – We Now Have A Facebook Page – So Please Like It!

Related Posts:

Most Read in Site News:
- Welcome to Darknet – The REBIRTH - 36,569 views
- Get the ball rollin’ - 18,992 views
- Slashdot Effect vs Digg Effect Traffic Report - 12,251 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


Mozilla Beats Apple & Microsoft to Pwn2Own Patch For Firefox

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Seems like Pwn2Own is getting a reputation for uncovering some pretty nasty browser based vulnerabilities, once again this year Firefox, Safari and IE8 were all broken wide open. The latest development is Mozilla has beaten both Microsoft and Apple to the punch and released Firefox 3.6.3 patching the vulnerability.

Again it was a critical vulnerability and the creator netted himself $10,000 from the contest for the exploit. Pretty fast patching from Firefox though with an 8 day turnaround, and the vulnerability is only on Firefox 3.6.x not 3.5.x in its current state.

Mozilla late yesterday patched a critical Firefox vulnerability used by a German researcher to win $10,000 for hacking the open-source browser at last week’s Pwn2Own contest.

In a repeat of 2009, Mozilla was the first browser maker to patch a bug exploited at Pwn2Own. In fact, the company improved on its performance by fixing the newest flaw only eight days after Nils, a researcher who works for U.K.-based MWR InfoSecurity, hacked Firefox. Last year, Mozilla took 10 days to come up with its Pwn2Own fix. Nils also successfully exploited Firefox at 2009’s contest.

This time, Nils used a memory corruption flaw to hack the browser, Mozilla said in the security advisory that accompanied the update to Firefox 3.6.3. It rated the bug as “critical,” the highest threat ranking in its four-step scoring system.

Nils exploited Firefox 3.6.2 — Mozilla had patched the browser just two days before the contest kicked off — on 64-bit Windows 7 , also bypassing the operating system’s DEP (data execution prevention) and ASLR (address space layout randomization) defenses. For his work, Nils was awarded $10,000 by 3Com TippingPoint, Pwn2Own’s sponsor.

Gotta give him some props though, exploiting the latest version of Firefox and bypassing both DEP and ASLR. Nice work Nils! It just goes to shows, if the motivation is there (which it is for many blackhats) then an entry vector can be found.

Especially with the rapid pace of software development in the web era, there’s no way everything can be kept secure with all the additional features and functions that are constantly being added.

Other researchers hacked Apple’s Safari and Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 8 (IE8) to also win $10,000 each.

According to Mozilla, Nils’ exploit only works against Firefox 3.6, the newest edition, but the company said it planned to also patch Firefox 3.5 “just in case there is an alternate way of triggering the bug.” Mozilla did not specify a timeline for the Firefox 3.5 update. Firefox 3.5 was just patched last Monday to bring it to version 3.5.9.

Mozilla restricted access to additional information on the vulnerability by locking down Bugzilla, its change- and bug-tracking database, allowing only authorized users to view information on the flaw. That move is typical of Mozilla when it has patched some, but not all, of its browsers.

Neither Apple or Microsoft has announced plans to patch their Pwn2Own vulnerabilities. Microsoft has acknowledged receiving details of the IE8 vulnerabilities that Dutch researcher Peter Vreugdenhil used to hack the browser, but earlier this week said a patch was not ready.

Microsoft as usual have stated it is still ‘under investigation’ having just patched 10 vulnerabilities in IE8 last week, they now have another to add to the list. I’m not holding my breath for an out-of-band patch however.

Mozilla also made the move to lock the public out of the vulnerability details on Bugzilla to prevent it from getting into the wild.

No news from Apple yet on the Safari bug, wonder when they’ll come out with a fix for it? Or acknowledge it even? Or perhaps they’ve already fixed it and pushed out the patch..who knows?

Source: Network World


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Web Hacking

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Web Hacking | Add a Comment
Recent in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- BeautifulPeople.com Leak Exposes 1.1M Extremely Private Records
- Apple Will Not Patch Windows QuickTime Vulnerabilities
- BADLOCK – Are ‘Branded’ Exploits Going Too Far?

Related Posts:

Most Read in Exploits/Vulnerabilities:
- Learn to use Metasploit – Tutorials, Docs & Videos - 234,359 views
- AJAX: Is your application secure enough? - 120,031 views
- eEye Launches 0-Day Exploit Tracker - 85,486 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


pwnat – NAT To NAT Client Communication Tool

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


pwnat, pronounced “poe-nat”, is a tool that allows any number of clients behind NATs to communicate with a server behind a separate NAT with *no* port forwarding and *no* DMZ setup on any routers in order to directly communicate with each other. The server does not need to know anything about the clients trying to connect.

Simply put, this is a proxy server that works behind a NAT, even when the client is behind a NAT, without any 3rd party. There is no middle man, no proxy, no 3rd party, no UPnP/STUN/ICE required, no spoofing, and no DNS tricks. More importantly, the client can then connect to any host or port on any remote host or to a fixed host and port decided by the server.

pwnat is based off of the UDP tunneling software by Daniel Meekins, udptunnel, and my original chownat.

pwnat will work on most *nix operating systems. Tested on Linux and OS X.

You can download pwnat v0.2-beta here:

pwnat-0.2-beta.tgz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Network Hacking

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Hacking Tools, Network Hacking | Add a Comment
Recent in Hacking Tools:
- SubBrute – Subdomain Brute-forcing Tool
- The Backdoor Factory (BDF) – Patch Binaries With Shellcode
- Gdog – Python Windows Backdoor With Gmail Command & Control

Related Posts:

Most Read in Hacking Tools:
- Top 15 Security/Hacking Tools & Utilities - 1,973,486 views
- Brutus Password Cracker – Download brutus-aet2.zip AET2 - 1,401,446 views
- wwwhack 1.9 – Download wwwhack19.zip Web Hacking Tool - 676,050 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95


Open Source Keykeriki Captures Wireless Keyboard Traffic

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


Another interesting attack, rather than going after the PC/Server this one goes after the data sent by wireless devices such as the wireless keyboards sold by Microsoft. The neat thing is by using a replay attack you could also send rogue inputs to the device.

But then it serves Microsoft right for using XOR encryption for the data-steams, which can very easily be broken using frequency analysis.

Security researchers on Friday unveiled an open-source device that captures the traffic of a wide variety of wireless devices, including keyboards, medical devices, and remote controls.

Keykeriki version 2 captures the entire data stream sent between wireless devices using a popular series of chips made by Norway-based Nordic Semiconductor. That includes the device addresses and the raw payload being sent between them. The open-source package was developed by researchers of Switzerland-based Dreamlab Technologies and includes complete software, firmware, and schematics for building the $100 sniffer.

Keykeriki not only allows researchers or attackers to capture the entire layer 2 frames, it also allows them to send their own unauthorized payloads. That means devices that don’t encrypt communications – or don’t encrypt them properly – can be forced to cough up sensitive communications or be forced to execute rogue commands.

It’ll be interesting to see what other kinds of devices they can successfully use this data capture technique on. Keyboards are one thing, and I’d imagine the transmission range of a wireless keyboard is fairly limited so you or the sniffing device would have to be physically near to the target.

At least Logitech seem to have stepped up the security a bit by using AES-128 for the transmission on their wireless keyboards, but the researchers say they still may be able to crack it due to the way the secret keys are exchanged.

Again most likely not an algorithm problem but an issue with the implementation.

At the CanSecWest conference in Vancouver, Dreamlab Senior Security Expert Thorsten Schroder demonstrated how Keykeriki could be used to attack wireless keyboards sold by Microsoft. The exploit worked because communications in the devices are protected by a weak form of encryption known as xor, which is trivial to break. As a result, he was able to intercept keyboard strokes as they were typed and to remotely send input that executed commands on the attached computer.

“Microsoft made it easy for us because they used their own proprietary crypto,” Schroder said. “Xor is not a very proper way to secure data.”

Even when devices employ strong cryptography, Schroder said Keykeriki may still be able to remotely send unauthorized commands using a technique known as a replay attack, in which commands sent previously are recorded and then sent again.

News time is always fun during conference season due to the fact all these interesting and new attacks and vectors are released for public consumption – generally along with code and examples.

If they can use the same techniques to own more interesting devices with more sensitive data, things could certainly get a little more heated.

Source: The Register


Posted in: Hardware Hacking, Privacy

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted in: Hardware Hacking, Privacy | Add a Comment
Recent in Hardware Hacking:
- Kid Gets Arrested For Building A Clock – World Goes NUTS
- The Jeep HACK – What You Need To Know
- Rowhammer – DDR3 Exploit – What You Need To Know

Related Posts:

Most Read in Hardware Hacking:
- Elevator/Lift Hacking !!!!! - 78,891 views
- Military Communications Hacking – Script Kiddy Style - 49,776 views
- Hackers Crack London Tube Oyster Card - 44,696 views

Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium | 1 Year 1 PC for $24.95