Archive | 2009

TJX (T.J. Maxx and Marshall’s) Hacker Jailed For 30 Years

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You should be familiar with the TJX case by now (TJX Largest Breach of Customer Data in U.S. History) and we’ve been following it here for a couple of years.

We reported back in August last year that the TJX Credit Card Hackers were Busted and now one of the 11 guys involved has been slammed with one of the longest ever cybercrime sentences. He wasn’t directly involved in the TJX hack but he does seem to be one of the ‘enablers’ trading the stolen details and aiding in money laundering. He he said to have a made a massive $11 million from this!

Yastremskiy – or ‘Maksik’ as he was sometimes identified – was one of 11 people eventually arrested at the request of the US Department of Justice, with the Ukrainian reportedly being apprehended in undignified fashion outside a Turkish nightclub in 2008.

Yastremskiy’s part in the crime was allegedly to have purchased credit card numbers stolen during the huge crime, providing the gang with an economic hub for its activities. Other members of the gang hailed from Estonia, Belarus, China, and several parts of the US itself, underlining the global nature of modern electronic crime.

Although not the perpetrator of the hack itself, Yastremskiy would have been essential to its success. He is reported to have been suspected of being behind other crimes not related to the TJX Maxx affair.

Apparently on top of the crazy life sentence (life sentence is usually considered as 25 years) he got fined $23,000 as well – but that’s peanuts compared to the 11 mills he’s made. I think it’s a pretty harsh sentence, but the guy was flaunting it…not very wise really. And he was committing some pretty serious offline fraud with the money laundering, he was bound to get screwed with the US on his tail.

He was actually charged in August when we reported it for trafficking in stolen credit card information harvested from a string of retail firms including TJX, OfficeMax, Barnes & Noble, Forever 21, DSW, and Marshall’s, amongst others.

The TJX hack will go down as the first major disclosed commercial hack in history, after US-based hackers were able to ‘wardrive’ their way into a poorly-protected Wi-Fi system used for point-of-sale traffic. Forty-five million customer credit cards were said to have been exposed, leaving parent company. TJX Maxx, owning up to potential liabilities of at least $118 million.

Security vendors queued up to declare their satisfaction at the sentence. “Yastremskiy will certainly have plenty of time to ponder whether his hacking activities were worthwhile,” commented Graham Cluley of Sophos.

“The length of this jail time should also make others engaged in cybercrime think again,” he said. “It may seem like the chances of being caught are small, but there are more and more convictions happening all the time, and the authorities are getting better than ever at co-operating at an international level to catch the bad guys.”

US authorities have filed extradition papers but he still stood trial in Turkey for separate offences, if he ever makes it to the US it’s a good guess that he can cut a sweet deal by being a star witness for the prosecution and getting a reduced sentence in a much more comfortable white-collar US prison.

What do you guys think about the sentence, too harsh?

Source: Network World

Posted in: General Hacking, Legal Issues

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Time and Attack Mapper AKA TA-Mapper – Time/Effort Estimator Tool For Blackbox Security Assessment

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Time and Attack Mapper (alternatively known as TA-Mapper) is an effort estimator tool for blackbox security assessment (or Penetration Testing) of applications. This tool provides more accurate estimation when compared to rough estimation. Penetration testers who always has hard time explaining/justifying the efforts charged (or quoted) to their customers can find this tool handy by able to calculate efforts with greater accuracy required for application penetration testing.

In addition, this tool helps application pen-testers in itemizing their penetration testing efforts into micro-level and provides more clarity of their pen-testing activities. In future the author has plans to extend this tool ability to generate test cases.

The tool was written back in 2004 to support a freelance assessment. The author was intrigued to write this tool when he was asked by one of his Fortune 100 customer to justify efforts quoted against the activities for a penetration testing assignment. It not just helped him win the project but also help him educate the customer in knowing the activities involved at the micro-level. After making few changes in the tool the author thought it has been kept private too long and it’s the right time to share it with the world.

How it works

The strength of this tool lies in the background factors that were taken into consideration which helps in making an accurate estimation.

The tool makes it calculation based on various test types set against individual attacks. Almost all attacks performed against an application involve different factors in the way it is tested. Hence those different factors make it more complex to make a generic calculation of efforts. Around seven different test types were identified where different complex factors were mapped and grouped to come up with a mathematical formula for calculating efforts against individual attacks.

You can download TA-Mapper here:

Or read more here.

Posted in: General Hacking, Security Software

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Cisco Vulnerability Given ‘Write Once, Run Anywhere’ Treatement

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This is an interesting development in router security, Cisco bugs have been popping up now and then – not that often – but usually when they do they are quite serious.

The problem with them was you needed so many variations unless you were just targeting one specific router, with that specific version of IOS and hardware. Now someone has applied the ‘Write Once, Run Anywhere’ programming principle to Cisco exploits enabling one exploit to run on a far wider variety of Cisco platforms than was previously possible.

This is quite serious as most of the Internet architecture is based at some point of peering on a Cisco device.

A researcher has discovered a way to reliably exploit a known security vulnerability in a wide class of Cisco System routers, a finding that for the first time allows attackers to hijack millions of devices with a single piece of code.

The discovery by Felix “FX” Lindner of Recurity Labs in Berlin brings the write-once-run-anywhere approach of software development to the dark art of compromising routers that form the core of the internet. Previously, reliable exploit code had to be specifically fashioned to one of more than 15,000 different supported builds of IOS, or Internet Operating System, which run various Cisco devices.

“What FX has shown, conclusively, is that when something comes out that can potentially compromise your router, you have to get on it as you would get on a remote vuln, for, say, your domain controllers or database servers,” said Dan Kaminsky, a fellow researcher who has reviewed Lindner’s findings (PDF). “Router infrastructure has been conclusively proven to be as generically vulnerable as commodity operating systems.”

FX who is better known from his association with Phenoelit recently demonstrated his findings at CCC (Chaos Communication Congress) with a known vulnerability.

If this gets into the wrong hands it could be bad new, but then as always I would assume it’s already in the wrong hands and has been for time (and they’ve been using it) under the radar.

The problem with routers is that once comprised subtle changes can be made to the routing tables and firewall rules that can severely compromise a network and be very hard to detect.

Each image version of IOS loads programs in substantially different parts of the device’s memory. Until now, the randomization made it virtually impossible for weaponized exploit code to know ahead of time where to stash malicious payloads for the specific device it was targeting. Lindner was able to work through this limitation by observing the behavior of software known as ROMmon, which is analogous to the ubiquitous bios software found on personal computers.

By using small chunks of ROMmon, Lindner has shown that it’s possible to drop code into specific memory locations and then execute it. At last week’s Chaos Communication Congress he used the technique to reliably exploit a known vulnerability across a wide class of Cisco routers. The exploit disabled the devices’ CPU caches and instead got them to load his own code.

The method works on any Cisco device that uses a PowerPC processor, which includes the widely used 2600 and 17000 series routers. He has yet to find a similarly reliable way to attack Cisco gear that uses MIPS microprocessors, but said he is close.

In the last part of the article they raise a very good point, it is extremely hard to update a router with IOS, especially the older ones as it can really b0rk the configuration and leave you in a heap of trouble.

During many audits I’ve found core Cisco devices running horribly out of date software with serious remote exploits.

I hope Cisco addresses this and makes it easier for their clients to keep running a secure version.

Source: The Register

Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hardware Hacking, Network Hacking

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WITOOL v0.1 – GUI Based SQL Injection Tool in .NET

Your website & network are Hackable

WITOOL is an graphical based SQL Injection Tool written in dotNET.

– For SQL Server, Oracle
– Error Base and Union Base


WITOOL v0.1 SQL Injection Tool


  • Retrieve schema : DB/TableSpace, Table, Column, other object
  • Retrieve data : retrive paging, dump xml file
  • Log : View the raw data HTTP log


OS: Windows 2000/XP/VISTA
Requirement: Microsoft .NET(2.0) Library (Download Here).

You can download WITOOL v0.1 here:

Or read more here.

Posted in: Database Hacking, Hacking Tools, Web Hacking

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