11 September 2009 | 43,449 views

One Of The World’s Most Prolific Music Piracy Groups Busted

Acunetix Web Application Security

Seems like the Feds have been busy in recent year, all kinds of hackers, phishers an dnow pirates are getting arrested and imprisoned for some serious jailtime.

The latest in this strung of busts is the music piracy ground RNS or Rabid Neurosis, very eminent in the scene in the late 90s/early 2000s.

With P2P and people ripping stuff themselves, is ‘the scene’ dying or are most releases repackaged group releases? I’ve been out of the whole 0day warez/racing/fxp thing for a long time, so I honestly have no idea.

Six men have been accused of running the world’s most prolific music piracy ring, an online crew federal prosecutors allege delivered more than 25,000 copyrighted albums, often before they were officially released.

As members of Rabid Neurosis, or RNS as the group was called, they tapped insiders at music retailers, radio stations, and CD manufacturing plants, who were able to get their hands on music titles before their commercial release in the US. In other cases, they turned to affiliates elsewhere in the world, who were able to supply music that was not yet available in America.

“These reproductions were done for the benefit of the members of RNS and other affiliated piracy groups, in that, by getting a reputation for providing pirated materials that were previously unavailable on the piracy scene, RNS members were granted access to massive libraries of pirated music, video games, software and movies,” prosecutors alleged in court documents filed Wednesday.

They have an impressive record though often releasing full retail albums before they were for sale! They stopped around 2007 tho, I guess that’s when Bit Torrent and p2p was really taking off.

25,000 albums is a serious number though I’d guess their restitution is definitely going to be in the millions. But then historically the fines given out for piracy cases has just been completely ridiculous.

The most likely outcome, 6 more people filling for bankruptcy.

The claim of personal benefit is important, since sentencing guidelines frequently require a showing that copyright infringers financially gained from their activities.

Wednesday’s indictment, filed in US District Court in the Eastern District of Virginia, named Adil R. Cassim, 29, of Granada Hills, California, the alleged leader of the group, Matthew D. Chow, 28, of Missouri City, Texas, Bennie L. Glover, 35, of Shelby, North Carolina, an employee of a CD production plant, and Edward Mohan II, 46, of Baltimore.

Each was charged with a single count of conspiracy to commit copyright infringement. If convicted each faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a fine of $250,000, in addition to a possible order to pay restitution.

Patrick L. Saunders, 30, of Brooklyn, New York, was charged in August and pleaded guilty on Tuesday to one count of copyright infringement. James A. Dockery, 39, of Mooresboro, North Carolina was charged on Tuesday.

They had an impressive network of contacts with people from retail outlets, cd printing factories and radio stations. All the people who get tracks and whole albums before they hit the streets.

I’m sure there will be plenty more similar cases to follow in the near future.

Source: The Register





                

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6 Responses to “One Of The World’s Most Prolific Music Piracy Groups Busted”

  1. Bowling Tips 11 September 2009 at 7:56 am Permalink

    thats good news, these people should be behind the bars. We should strictly oppose piracy…

  2. GZero 11 September 2009 at 8:35 am Permalink

    As a software developer I can agree that piracy is wrong. But until a commercial entity offers a viable alternative to stealing music (Spotify is as close as they’ve got so far, and I’m a paid subscriber and I love it) then it will continue.

  3. Anonymous 15 September 2009 at 1:17 am Permalink

    YES! PIRACY IS MORALLY WRONG AND SHOULD BE STRICLY PUNISHED LIKE A CAPITAL CRIME!!!ONEONEONEELEVEN

    GOD SAID THOU SHALL NOT COMMIT PIRACY!!!

  4. Anon-y-mouse 18 September 2009 at 11:28 am Permalink

    I say kill’em all let god sort’em out!

    I think the MPAA should start a program, free albums to anyone who reports a neighbor, loved one, friend, boss, co-worker or random stranger that uses bit torrent, soulseek, etc, etc. Of course piracy will resume after all the “pirates” are snitched out and the MPAA stops doling out free albums. I love socially recursive loops.

  5. habib 21 September 2009 at 3:11 pm Permalink

    these people haven’t been involved for over 6 years… yet the guys who are currently involved run circles around the RIAA. Good job morons.

  6. qwer 10 October 2009 at 3:46 am Permalink

    dalive and kali were always so arogant all rns ppl ! they deserve it