Archive | March, 2009

BBC Unleashes Botnet For ‘Investigation’

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The BBC has made an odd move recently by buying/seeding a botnet of 22,000 computers under the guise of investigative journalism.

They claim it’s not illegal as they caused no harm and only sent spam to e-mail accounts used by themselves. Technically I think it’s still breaking the law under the Computer Misuse Act but most likely nothing would happen as they caused no damage or losses (According to lawyer Struan Robertson BBC did violate the act).

Software used to control thousands of home computers has been acquired online by the BBC as part of an investigation into global cyber crime.

The technology programme Click has demonstrated just how at risk PCs are of being taken over by hackers. Almost 22,000 computers made up Click’s network of hijacked machines, which has now been disabled.

The BBC has now warned users that their PCs are infected, and advised them on how to make their systems more secure. Click managed to acquire its own low-value botnet – the name given to a network of hijacked computers – after visiting chatrooms on the internet.

The programme did not access any personal information on the infected PCs. If this exercise had been done with criminal intent it would be breaking the law.

The whole thing has created quite a furor in the computer security scene, with people debating the legality and ethics involved.

Which was probably what the BBC wanted in the first place, the more people talk about it the better right?

SMH even claim the whole thing back-fired.

By prior agreement, Click launched a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack on a backup site owned by security company Prevx. Click then ordered its slave PCs to bombard its target site with requests for access to make it inaccessible.

Amazingly, it took only 60 machines to overload the site’s bandwidth. DDoS attacks are used by extortionists who threaten to knock a site offline unless a hefty ransom is paid. Jacques Erasmus from Prevx said that high-traffic websites with big revenues are a “massive target” for this kind of attack.

“Cyber criminals are getting into contact with websites and threatening them with DDoS attacks. “The loss of trade is very substantial so a lot of these websites just pay-up to avoid it,” he explained.

But well pushing the boundaries, that’s what investigative journalism is about right? We’ve had enough programs about pimps, triads and drugs – why not some about cybercrime and the underbelly on the Internet.

I hope I manage to view the show, it sounds like it’ll be interesting (even if ethically questionable).

But well aren’t all the best things on that thin grey line?

Source: BBC


Posted in: Legal Issues, Malware, Spammers & Scammers

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WarVOX – Wardialing Tool Suite (Explore, Classify & Audit Telephone Systems)

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WarVOX is a suite of tools for exploring, classifying, and auditing telephone systems. Unlike normal wardialing tools, WarVOX works with the actual audio from each call and does not use a modem directly. This model allows WarVOX to find and classify a wide range of interesting lines, including modems, faxes, voice mail boxes, PBXs, loops, dial tones, IVRs, and forwarders.

WarVOX provides the unique ability to classify all telephone lines in a given range, not just those connected to modems, allowing for a comprehensive audit of a telephone system.

WarVOX requires no telephony hardware and is massively scalable by leveraging Internet-based VoIP providers. A single instance of WarVOX on a residential broadband connection, with a typical VoIP account, can scan over 1,000 numbers per hour. The speed of WarVOX is limited only by downstream bandwidth and the limitations of the VoIP service. Using two providers with over 40 concurrent lines we have been able to scan entire 10,000 number prefixes within 3 hours.


The resulting call audio can be used to extract a list of modems that can be fed into a standard modem-based wardialing application for fingerprinting and banner collection. One of the great things about the WarVOX model is that once the data has been gathered, it is archived and available for re-analysis as new signatures, plugins, and tools are developed.

The current release of WarVOX (1.0.0) is able to automatically detect modems, faxes, silence, voice mail boxes, dial tones, and voices.

You can download WarVOX 1.0.0. here:

warvox-1.0.0.tar.gz

The latest development version of WarVOX can be accessed from Subversion with the following command:

Or read more here, PDF presentation here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Network Hacking

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Malware Distributor & Bot Network Master Sentenced To 4 Years

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It seems to the feds are really cracking down on cybercrime recently, with a special kind of attention paid to botnets and their handlers. The sentences are getting stiffer too, this time with 4 years in prison for running a botnet and data theft.

I hope they keep it up, botnets are the scourge of the Internet and people should feel safe about their bank accounts and Paypal money. The Internet is becoming a bad neighborhood with people looking over their shoulders all the time.

A Los Angeles man was sentenced late Wednesday in federal court to four years in prison after pleading guilty last year to infecting as many as 250,000 computers and stealing thousands of peoples’ identities and hijacking their bank accounts.

The Los Angeles authorities said John Schiefer, 27, was the nation’s first defendant to plead guilty to wiretapping charges (.pdf) in connection to using botnets.

Schiefer, who went by the online handle “acidstorm,” faced as many as 60 years in prison and acknowledged using a botnet to remotely control computers across the United States. Once in control of the computers, the authorities said, (.pdf) his spybot malware allowed him to intercept computer communications. He mined usernames and passwords on accounts such as PayPal and made purchases totaling thousands of dollars without consent.

The first one to plead guilty eh? I guess the others will fall later with charges that can rack up some serious prison time with back to back sentences. I guess pleading guilty saved him from the possible 60 year sentence.

It must be hard to track the exact amount he conned from people and stole from Paypal accounts as there’s no real way to audit it. But as the law goes estimates are made by extrapolating whatever hard data they do have.

The authorities said he worked by day as an information security consultant with 3G Communications. After his guilty plea, Schiefer was hired at Mahalo, the so-called “human powered search engine.” Its founder, Jason Calacanis wrote that the company failed to realize that the Los Angeles company had hired a man who had pleaded guilty to being a hacker.

The defendant was among eight individuals indicted or successfully prosecuted in a crack down on black hat hackers who use armies of zombie computers to commit financial fraud, attack web sites with floods of traffic and send spam. The crimes at issue involved more than $20 million in losses, according to the FBI.

The FBI dubbed the eight cases “Operation Bot Roast II” — the second round of its investigations against botnets, one of the most dangerous threats online today. The first FBI crackdown on botnets was announced in June, 2007.

$20 million in losses seems a fairly generous estimate, but then I guess it makes for better headlines right? I wonder when “Operating Bot Roast III” will begin?

It won’t be too long I imagine, I hope they crack down on the botnets sending out spam – those are the ones that REALLY irk me.

Source: Wired (Thanks Navin)


Posted in: Legal Issues, Malware

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VideoJak – IP Video Security Assessment Tool

Your website & network are Hackable


What is VideoJak?

VideoJak is an IP Video security assessment tool that can simulate a proof of concept DoS against a targeted, user-selected video session and IP video phone. VideoJak is the first of its kind security tool that analyzes video codec standards such as H.264.

VideoJak works by first capturing the RTP port used in a video conversation and analyzing the RTP packets, collecting the RTP sequence numbers and timestamp values used between the phones. Then VideoJak creates a custom video payload by changing the sequence numbers and timestamp values used in the original RTP packets between the two phones. After the user selects a targeted phone to attack in an ongoing video session, VideoJak delivers the payload over the learned RTP port against the target. This attack results in severely degraded video and audio quality.

Overview

VideoJak is designed in consideration of todays UC infrastructure implementions in which QoS requirements dictate the separation of data and VoIP/Video into discrete networks or VLANs. VideoJak is a proof of concept security assessment tool that can be used to test video applications. Future versions of the tool will support more exciting features.

Features

  • VLAN Discovery (CDP) and VLAN Hop
  • Call pattern tracking for SIP and SCCP signaling protocols
  • Audio codec (G.711u, G.722) and Video codec (H.263, H.264) support
  • Creates custom payload from H.263/H.264 packet capture
  • MitM functions and host management
  • Allows user to select ongoing video call from a menu
  • Allows user to select a targeted IP Phone for DoS within the video session
  • Enables the user to send the attack during an active, ongoing video call

You can download VideoJak here:

videojak-1.00.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Network Hacking, Privacy

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Google Native Client Security/Hacking Contest – Win $8,192 USD!

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What is Native Client?

Native Client is an open-source research technology for running x86 native code in web applications, with the goal of maintaining the browser neutrality, OS portability, and safety that people expect from web apps. We’ve released this project at an early, research stage to get feedback from the security and broader open-source communities. We believe that Native Client technology will someday help web developers to create richer and more dynamic browser-based applications.

About the contest

Do you think it is impossible to safely run untrusted x86 code on the web? Do you want a chance to impress a panel of some of the top security experts in the world? Then submit an exploit to the Native Client Security Contest and you could also win cash prizes, not to mention bragging rights.

What is the contest

This is a contest with the goal to test the security of Native Client.

To participate, you will need to:

  • Register yourself (or your team)
  • Download our latest build
  • Join the NaCl discussion group
  • Report the exploits you find to our team

When

You can register for the contest on Wednesday, February 25th 2009. The contest will end on Tuesday, May 5th 2009 at 11:59:59 Pacific time. Sign up early to start reporting exploits as soon as possible.

What’s in it for you

Participating in the contest means that you will engage with early stage research technology. In addition, your work will be reviewed by a panel of security experts from some of the world’s most renowned universities, chaired by Edward Felten of Princeton University. Finally, by submitting high impact bug(s), you will also have the chance to compete to win one of our five cash prizes, as well as the recognition of your peers.

Eligible participants that are ranked in the top 5 positions of the competition by Judges will receive the following awards in U.S. Dollars based on their rank:

1st prize: $8,192.00
2nd prize: $4,096.00
3rd prize: $2,048.00
4th prize: $1,024.00
5th prize: $1,024.00

Winning Entries will be announced on or about December 7th.

Details at:

http://code.google.com/contests/nativeclient-security/


Posted in: General Hacking, Programming

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fzem – MUA (Mail User Agent) / Mail Client Fuzzer

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fzem is a MUA (mail user agent) fuzzer that fuzzes MAIL/MIME email headers as well as how clients handle SMTP, POP and IMAP responses.

Purpose

fzem’s purpose is to fuzz MUAs as they process email content and handle server reponses.

How does it work?

fzem has the three main mail protocols implemented as well as mail/mime headers. Using these we can manipulate emails and responses to include fuzzing data from our fuzzing oracle or from the user.

A user can command fzem to run in various modes and perform differently in those modes.

  • Fuzz SMTP OK responses
  • Fuzz SMTP ERROR responses
  • Fuzz SMTP using custom fuzz data
  • Fuzz MAIL/MIME headers
  • Fuzz MAIL/MIME headers using custom fuzz data
  • Fuzz MAIL/MIME headers using custom headers
  • Fuzz POP3 OK responses
  • Fuzz POP3 ERROR responses
  • Fuzz POP3 using custom fuzz data
  • Fuzz IMAP4 OK responses
  • Fuzz IMAP4 ERROR responses
  • Fuzz IMAP4 using custom fuzz data

We can also choose a specific port to listen on (-P) and take advantage of the useful debug option (-D).

You can download fzem here:

fzem.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hacking Tools, Programming

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Twitter ClickJacking Vulnerability

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Click-jacking has hit the news a few times recently with most browsers being susceptible to this kind of redirection attack.

This time it’s Twitter that’s being hit, as with anything gaining popularity it’s going to become the focus of more attacks and attempts to compromise its security.

It seems like click-jacking may well be here to stay and it might become a widespread problem, especially for sites with interactive content and especially for those based around ‘voting‘ systems.

Two weeks after the micro-blogging site immunized its users against a fast-moving worm that caused them to unintentionally broadcast messages when they clicked on an innocuous-looking button, hackers have found a new way to exploit the clickjacking vulnerability.

The latest attack comes from UK-based web developer Tom Graham, who discovered that the fix Twitter rolled out wasn’t applied to the mobile phone section of the site. By the time we stumbled on his findings, the exploit no longer worked. But security consultant Rafal Los sent us a minor modification that sufficiently pwned a dummy account we set up for testing purposes.

“The mobile site currently has no javascript on it at all, which is probably for a good reason as most mobile phones don’t support it,” Graham writes. “So it begs the question, how should Twitter prevent this click-jacking exploit?”

This problem was once again quickly fixed, but I’m sure it can be tweaked again to wreak havoc. Plus of course these vulnerabilities are being published in the open and blown up on mass-media sites so they get attention quickly.

I’m sure there’s plenty of people out there who aren’t quite so honourable and are more interested in gaming the system for their own benefit.

It’s an interesting way for spammers to infest Twitter with spam on legitimate accounts, all they have to do is get the user to click a button somewhere on a quiz or game and it’s a done deal.

The proof-of-concept page presents the user with the question “Do you have a tiny face?” along with buttons to answer “yes” or “no.” Choosing the affirmative while logged in to Twitter causes the account to publicly declare: “I have a tiny face, do you?” and then include a link to Graham’s post.

The exploit is the latest reason to believe that clickjacking, on Twitter and elsewhere, is here to stay, at least until HTML specifications are rewritten. No doubt web developers will continue to come up with work-arounds, but hackers can just as quickly find new ways to exploit the vulnerability, it seems.

That’s because clickjacking attacks a fundamental design of HTML itself. It’s pulled off by hiding the target URL within a specially designed iframe that’s concealed by a decoy page that contains submission buttons. Virtually every website and browser is susceptible to the technique.

It’ll be interesting to see how long this cat and mouse chase goes on and if a version of the exploit can be crafted that will still work whatever Twitter does (discounting a major rebuild of their architecture and technology).

I’m sure other sites are vulnerable too, perhaps we’ll see Facebook version soon which will post a Note or a message on your profile crafted by the site serving up the click-jacking exploit.

Source: The Register


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Web Hacking

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Medusa v1.5 Released – Parallel, Modular Login Brute Forcing Tool

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Finally an update to Medusa! Version 1.5 of Medusa is now available for public download. Medusa 1.4 was released quite some time back in November 2007 and before that Medusa 1.3 showed up November 2006.

You would have thought version 1.5 would have been released in November 2008! Looks like they missed by a few months.

What is Medusa?

Medusa is a speedy, massively parallel, modular, login brute-forcer for network services. Some of the key features of Medusa are:

  • Thread-based parallel testing. Brute-force testing can be performed against multiple hosts, users or passwords concurrently.
  • Flexible user input. Target information (host/user/password) can be specified in a variety of ways. For example, each item can be either a single entry or a file containing multiple entries. Additionally, a combination file format allows the user to refine their target listing.
  • Modular design. Each service module exists as an independent .mod file. This means that no modifications are necessary to the core application in order to extend the supported list of services for brute-forcing.

It currently has modules for the following services:

  • AFP
  • CVS
  • FTP
  • HTTP
  • IMAP
  • MS-SQL
  • MySQL
  • NCP (NetWare)
  • NNTP
  • PcAnywhere
  • POP3
  • PostgreSQL
  • rexec
  • rlogin
  • rsh
  • SMB
  • SMTP (AUTH/VRFY)
  • SNMP
  • SSHv2
  • SVN
  • Telnet
  • VmAuthd
  • VNC

It also includes a basic web form module and a generic wrapper module for external scripts.

While Medusa was designed to serve the same purpose as THC-Hydra, there are several significant differences – you can see a brief comparison here.

It’s been over a year since version 1.4 was released and there has been a bunch of changes. This release includes multiple bug fixes, several new modules and additional module functionality. The following is a quick rundown on some of the new features, if you wish to see a detailed ChangeLog it’s here.

  • AFP – new module (still marked as unstable)
  • HTTP – digest auth support
  • IMAP – STARTTLS, NTLM support
  • POP3 – STARTTLS, LOGIN, PLAIN, NTLM support
  • SMBNT – LM, LMv2, NTLMv2 support
  • SMTP – NTLM support
  • TELNET – AS/400 (TN5250) support
  • misc. core and module bug fixes

You can download Medusa v1.5 here:

medusa-1.5.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Hacking Tools, Network Hacking, Password Cracking

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Koobface Worm Variant Hits Facebook

Your website & network are Hackable


Koobface is computer worm that targets the users of the social networking websites Facebook and Myspace. Koobface ultimately attempts, upon successful infection, to gather sensitive information from the victims such as credit card numbers.

A new variation of Koobface has popped up aggressively on Facebook and is attempting to steal login credentials for other social networking sites.

It’s heavy on the user of Social Engineering by using the old familiarity ploy and trying to lure users into execution the spurious malware.

Researchers at Trend Micro report that a new variant of the Koobface worm is squiggling through Facebook, infecting users and attempting to steal cookies with log-in information for sites such as MySpace.com, MyYearbook.com, Bebo and Hi5 Networks. The Koobface worm first appeared in 2008.

Researchers at Trend Micro are reporting that a new variant of the Koobface worm is spreading on Facebook.

Koobface first appeared in 2008, with separate variants striking members of Facebook and MySpace.com. Now the Koobface worm is back again, with an eye toward stealing cookies for other social networking sites.

According to Trend Micro, the new variant sends Facebook messages claiming to be from a friend. The messages link to a spoofed YouTube video. In an interesting social engineering ploy, the malicious landing page not only displays the friend’s name, but also a picture pulled from the person’s Facebook profile.

It’s a pretty standard modus operandi for malware distributors, a new version of Flash seems to be a very common theme amongst these kinds of worm.

It seems like quite a lot of thought has gone into the design of this worm and due to the pretty slick distribution method it might become quite a large scale infection. It’s endgame is to create some kind of botnet and to steal the real information of value (banking details, credit card numbers etc).


The page prompts the user to install a new version of Adobe Flash. Users who agree are redirected to a download site for the file setup.exe, which is the new Koobface variant. Trend Micro detects the worm as WORM_KOOBFACE.AZ, and reported March 1 that its researchers had seen more than 300 unique IP addresses hosting the .exe file.

Trend Micro is expecting to see more.

“We’re only flagging a few hits at the moment, but the complexity with which this threat has been created shows how much work has been done to social-engineer social networks with the end game of creating [botlike] accounts to send out third-party links to almost anything,” said Jamz Yaneza, a threat researcher at Trend Micro.

The latest iteration of the worm runs on Windows 98, ME, NT, 2000 and XP and Server 2003. It sends and receives information by connecting to several servers, allowing hackers to remotely execute commands on a compromised machine.

Once infected the malware will search the users machine for Cookies from other social networking sites such as MySpace.com, Hi5 Networks, MyYearbook.com and Bebo.

As always, warn whoever you know that might use Facebook and generally tell people not to install or run anything that they aren’t expecting or didn’t specifically look for.

If they want to update Flash tell them ONLY to ever do it at the Adobe site.

Source: eWeek


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Malware, Web Hacking

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