Archive | August, 2008

ISR-evilgrade – Inject Updates to Exploit Software

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


ISR-evilgrade is a modular framework that allow us to take advantage of poor upgrade implementations by injecting fake updates and exploiting the system or software.

How does it work?

It works with modules, each module implements the structure needed to emulate a false update of specific applications/systems. Evilgrade needs the manipulation of the victims DNS traffic, it works in conjunction with man-in-the-middle techniques or MITM such as DNS, ARP, DHCP, etc.

Attack Vectors

Internal scenario:

  • Internal DNS access
  • ARP Spoofing
  • DNS Cache Poisoning
  • DHCP Spoofing

External scenario:

  • Internal DNS Access
  • DNS Cache Poisoning

What are the supported OS?

The framework is multiplatform, it only depends of having the right payload for the target platform to be exploited.

Implemented modules

  • Java plugin
  • Winzip
  • Winamp
  • MacOS
  • OpenOffice
  • iTunes
  • Linkedin Toolbar
  • DAP [Download Accelerator]
  • Notepad++

You can download ISR-evilgrade here:

isr-evilgrade-1.0.0.tar.gz

Or read more here.


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hacking Tools, Programming

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Webcam Hacker Jailed for 4 Years for Spying on Teenager

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Another one bites the dust, this time for spying on a teenage girl via webcam. 4 years is a reasonable sentence this time I think as the case borders on many offenses such as blackmail, indecent behaviour, infringement of privacy, unlawful access and probably a few more.

It was a pretty simple hack as it goes, a trojan and then straight forward access to the webcam – this case is the reason most security minded people cover their webcam with something just in case.

A 47-year-old computer technician has been jailed for four years after he hacked into a teenage girl’s webcam to spy on her.

The unnamed hacker used a Trojan horse virus to access the webcam remotely, which was passed on to the girl’s computer through an infected email.

Once he hacked into the webcam, he took images of her and threatened her with blackmail unless the teenager ‘posed’ indecently for him.

If he’d done it just for kicks and not tried to blackmail the poor girl he probably would have gotten away with it. Why do people have to be so greedy?

Human nature.

The news of the hacker comes from Sophos, the analysis centre for virus, spyware and spam, where the company reports that the man was arrested back in 2005, but has only been brought to justice this week.

Speaking about the court ruling, Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos, said: “Most spyware is designed to steal your identity, your passwords, your banking information – but it is just as easy to program a Trojan horse to take over your webcam.”

“This case highlights that as well as malware being used for financial gain, it can also be used by voyeurs. Everyone needs to treat computer security as paramount importance to ensure they do not fall victim to an internet blackmailer or peeping tom.”

Most of the oldskool trojans like Back Orifice and DeepThroat came with capabilities to capture frames from the webcam, open and close the CD drive, invert the monitor display, pop up chat windows and many other ‘fun’ features.

I doubt this guy programmed anything himself, most likely he just downloaded something, bound it to something tempting and e-mailed it to the girl.

Source: Tech Radar (Thanks Navin)


Posted in: General Hacking, Legal Issues, Malware

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OpenVAS – Open Vulnerability Assessment System (Nessus is Back!)

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


As you all probably known since version 3 Nessus turned to a proprietary model and started charging for the latest plugins locking most of us out. Now we finally have a new, properly organised forked development with the name of OpenVAS – at last a decent and free Vulnerability Scanner!

OpenVAS stands for Open Vulnerability Assessment System and is a network security scanner with associated tools like a graphical user front-end. The core component is a server with a set of network vulnerability tests (NVTs) to detect security problems in remote systems and applications.

OpenVAS products are Free Software under GNU GPL and a fork of Nessus.

About OpenVAS Server

The OpenVAS Server is the core application of the OpenVAS project. It is a scanner that runs many network vulnerability tests against many target hosts and delivers the results. It uses a communication protocol to have client tools (graphical end-user or batched) connect to it, configure and execute a scan and finally receive the results for reporting. Tests are implemented in the form of plugins which need to be updated to cover recently identified security issues.

The server consists of 4 modules: openvas-libraries, openvas-libnasl, openvas-server and openvas-plugins. All need to be installed for a fully functional server.

OpenVAS server is a forked development of Nessus 2.2. The fork happened because the major development (Nessus 3) changed to a proprietary license model and the development of Nessus 2.2.x is practically closed for third party contributors. OpenVAS continues as Free Software under the GNU General Public License with a transparent and open development style.

About OpenVAS-Client

OpenVAS-Client is a terminal and GUI client application for both OpenVAS and Nessus. It implements the Nessus Transfer Protocol (NTP). The GUI is implemented using GTK+ 2.4 and allows for managing network vulnerability scan sessions.

OpenVAS-Client is a successor of NessusClient 1.X. The fork happened with NessusClient CVS HEAD 20070704. The reason was that the original authors of NessusClient decided to stop active development for this (GTK-based) NessusClient in favor of a newly written QT-based version released as proprietary software.

OpenVAS-Client is released under GNU GPLv2 and may be linked with OpenSSL.

You can download OpenVAS here:

OpenVAS Client
OpenVAS Server

Or read more here.


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hacking Tools, Network Hacking

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New MySpace and Facebook Worm Target Social Networks

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


Well another reason for you guys (and gals) to avoid social networks, a new worm is spreading. Again they are using the same ploys that have been leveraged for years on e-mail and instant messaging.

Trust is gained as the message or link/video/etc comes from a known source so people are more likely to click/open/play it and infect themselves.

Just because a “friend” sends you something on Facebook or MySpace doesn’t mean you should trust it.

A new worm is spreading via Facebook and MySpace, turning victims’ computers into zombies on a botnet, Kaspersky Lab said on Friday.

Basically, infected machines are propagating the worm by sending messages via the social networks to friends in the network.

The messages look like they contain links to video clips. When clicked on they prompt the recipient to download an executable file that purports to be the latest version of Flash Player. Instead, it is the worm itself, infecting yet another victim.

It seems this one is not just interested in spamming your wall or putting something stupid or embarrassing in your profile.

This social networking worm is another vector for installing an actual executable on your computer and turning your machine into a zombie.

When infected machines log onto the social networks the next time their computers automatically send the malicious messages out to new victims grabbed from the friend list, said Ryan Naraine, security evangelist at Kaspersky.

“We’ve seen these types of worms before, typically around MySpace,” he said. “People are more trusting of things they receive from a friend,” and many people don’t recognize that what they are downloading isn’t a legitimate Flash Player file, but a malicious program.

Naraine repeated the refrain that security professionals have been spreading for years: be careful about downloading anything to your computer, even if it appears to come from a friend; and be diligent about applying security patches to your computer.

The same warnings apply to this as anything else, don’t download unknown executables! Definitely don’t install anything that you didn’t download yourself and have scanned with an up to date antivirus package.

Even if it comes from someone you know it doesn’t mean they actually sent it, you better ask them first if they really meant to send it or they are infected with something.

Source: Cnet (Thanks to Navin)


Posted in: Malware, Privacy, Web Hacking

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raWPacket HeX – Network Security Monitoring & Analysis LiveCD

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


HeX is a project aimed at the NSM (Network Security Monitoring) community for use by network security analysts. The developers believe that simplicity and analysis work flow logic must be enhanced and emphasized through-out the process of designing this liveCD. Not only have they carefully chosen all the necessary applications and tools to be included to the liveCD, they have also tested them to make sure everything running as smooth as possible. In order to summarize the objective of HeX, they are trying to develop the first and foremost Network Security Monitoring & Network Based Forensics liveCD!

HeX Main Features

HeX Main Menu – Cleaner look and more user interface oriented and maximum 4 levels depth HeX Main Menu allows quick access to all the installed applications in HeX.

Terminal – This is exactly what you need, the ultimate analyzt console!

Instant access to all the Network Security Monitoring(NSM) and Network Based Forensics(NBF) Toolkits via Fluxbox Menu. We have also categorized them nicely so that you know what to use conditionally or based on scenario.

Instant access to the Network Visualization Toolkit, you can watch the network traffics in graphical presentation and that assist you in identifying large scale network attacks easily.

Instant access to Pcap Editing Tools which you can use to modify or anonymize the pcap data, it’s great especially when you want to share your pcap data.

Network and Pentest Toolkits contain a lot of tools to perform network or application based attacks, you can generate malicious packets using them and study malicious packets using those analysis tools listed in NSM-Toolkit and NBF-Toolkit as well.

While we think HeliX liveCD is better choice in digital forensics arsenal, Forensics-Toolkit can be considered as the add-on for people who are interested in doing digital forensics.

Under Applications, there are Desktop, Sysutils and Misc, all of them are pretty self-explained and contain user based applications such as Firefox, Liferea, Xpdf and so forth. Additionally, Misc contains some useful scripts, for example you can just start ssh service by clicking on SSHD-Start.

You can download HeX 1.0.3 here:

hex-i386-1.0.3.iso

Or read more here.


Posted in: Forensics, Hacking Tools, Network Hacking

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TJX Credit Card Hackers Busted – Largest US Data Breach

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


We reported on this case back in September 2007, the largest US data breach in history so far (45 million customer records!).

It seems like finally the people behind it have been busted, 11 people have been charged by US authorities.

The US authorities have charged 11 people in connection with the theft of credit-card details in the country’s largest-ever identity theft case.

They are accused of stealing more than 40 million credit and debit card numbers before selling the information.

They allegedly hacked into the computer systems of several major US retailers and installed software to access account details and passwords. Prosecutors said the alleged fraud was an “international conspiracy”.

It seems like a pretty well organised operation, internationally collaborated across multiple continents to hit multiple chains.

I’d guess they made quite some money out of it…but well now then are going to pay the price.

Three of those charged are US citizens. The others come from Estonia, Ukraine, Belarus and China.

The 11 suspects are alleged to have obtained card numbers, account information and password details by driving around neighbourhoods and hacking into wireless equipment.

They are said to have then concealed the information in computer servers both in the US and Europe.

The Department of Justice said the scam caused “widespread” losses among banks, retailers and ordinary consumers – although it did not put a precise figure on the financial damage.

It seems like the usual suspects when it comes to hacking though, eastern european countries and China of course!

They seem to have covered their tracks pretty well so I wonder how they got caught. It’ll be an interesting case to follow and see what kind of sentences they get.

And of course if there’s any extradition involved.

Source: BBC News (Thanks Navin)


Posted in: Legal Issues, Privacy

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PuttyHijack V1.0 – Hijack SSH/PuTTY Connections on Windows

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


PuttyHijack is a POC tool that injects a dll into the PuTTY process to hijack an existing, or soon to be created, connection.

This can be useful during penetration tests when a windows box that has been compromised is used to SSH/Telnet into other servers. The injected DLL installs some hooks and creates a socket for a
callback connection that is then used for input/output redirection.

It does not kill the current connection, and will cleanly uninject if the socket or process is stopped.

Details

1) Start a nc listener
2) Run PuttyHijack specify the listener ip and port
3) Watch the echoing of everything including passwords

Some basic commands in this version include;

!disco – disconnect the real putty from the display
!reco – reconnect it
!exit – just another way to exit the injected shell

You can download PuttyHijack V1.0 here:

PuttyHijackV1.0.rar

Or read more here.


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Hacking Tools, Windows Hacking

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HD Moore’s Company BreakingPoint Suffers DNS Attack

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


It’s somewhat ironic that shortly after the Kaminsky DNS bug went wild and almost immediately got ported into Metasploit that it was then used to attack HD Moore’s very own company BreakingPoint.

It happened just a couple of days ago, it doesnt seem to have been a targeted attack though more like mass spammers/scammers leveraging on this flaw (as expected) to divert people to scam sites.

It happened on Tuesday morning, when Moore’s company, BreakingPoint, had some of its Internet traffic redirected to a fake Google page that was being run by a scammer. According to Moore, the hacker was able to do this by launching what’s known as a cache poisoning attack on a DNS server on AT&T’s network that was serving the Austin, Texas, area. One of BreakingPoint’s servers was forwarding DNS (Domain Name System) traffic to the AT&T server, so when it was compromised, so was HD Moore’s company.

When Moore tried to visit Google.com, he was actually redirected to a fake page that served up a Google page in one HTML frame along with three other pages designed to automatically click on advertisements.

It seems more of a problem with the ISP than BreakingPoint itself, but it still shows, if you rely on your ISPs DNS servers you don’t know what kind of fake content is getting served up to you.

Better safe than sorry right?

The flaw has to do with the way that DNS programs share information over the Internet. In a cache poisoning attack, the attacker tricks a DNS server into associating malicious IP addresses with legitimate domains, such as Google.com. Security experts say that this type of flaw could lead to very successful phishing attacks against Web surfers whose ISPs have not patched their servers.

Because of the nature of the AT&T hack, Moore doesn’t believe that he was targeted by the hackers. Even BreakingPoint employees didn’t realize that their internal DNS server had been configured to use the AT&T machine. Instead, he thinks that the hackers were simply trying to make a quick buck.

AT&T representatives were not immediately available to comment on the incident.

Moore believes that this type of attack may be going on at other ISPs as well.

I wonder if they managed to con anyone? And I wonder if AT&T has fixed this problem yet? It’s surprising that such a large ISP is still susceptible to this flaw after the amount of publicity the DNS bug has gotten.

Just be on the watch out!

Source: InfoWorld (Thanks Navin)


Posted in: Exploits/Vulnerabilities, Network Hacking, Spammers & Scammers

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July Commenter of the Month Competition Winner 2008!

Cybertroopers storming your ship?


Competition time again!

As you know we started the Darknet Commenter of the Month Competition on June 1st 2007 and it’s been running since then! We have just finished the fourteenth month of the competition in July and are now in the fifthteenth, starting a few days ago on August 1st – Sponsored by GFI.

We’ve successfully been holding this contest for a year now!

We are offering some pretty cool prizes including a £50 Amazon Gift Voucher, along with cool GFI merchandise like shirts, keyrings and mugs.

And now the winner will also get a soft copy of the Ethical Hacker Kit.

GFI Goodies

Keep up the great comments and high quality interaction, we really enjoy reading your discussions and feedback.

Just to remind you of the added perks, by being one of the top 5 commenter’s you also have your name and chosen link displayed on the sidebar all month on every page of Darknet, with a high PR5 (close to 6) on most pages (5000+ spidered by Google).

So announcing the winner for July…it’s zupakomputer!

Comments for July were pretty active, more so than June and really picked up towards the end of the month. zupakomputer has been leaving some very interesting and lengthy comments so I feel he really does deserve this prize. Navin actually had the most comments for 2 months in a row (the first time so far) but can’t win the prize twice, so keep up the good comments Navin!

Commenter July

There were some really really really LONG discussions in July and I hope they continue into August (which it looks like they will)! I’d like to thank you all for your participation! I hope it keeps getting better as 2008 develops with more interesting news and tools. Keep up the excellent discussions, it’s very interesting reading especially on some of the more controversial topics.

Thanks to everyone else who commented and thanks for your links and mentions around the blogosphere!

Feel free to share Darknet with everyone you know :)

Keep commenting guys, and stand to win a prize for the month of August!

A mailing address + telephone number will be requested from the winner for the sole purpose of sending out the gifts. The details will not be used from promotional purposes, and will not be sold.

Winner for June 2007 was Daniel with 35 comments.
Winner for July 2007 was backbone with 46 comments.
Winner for August 2007 was TheRealDonQuixote with 53 comments.
Winner for September 2007 was Sandeep Nain with 32 comments.
Winner for October 2007 was dre with 19 comments.
Winner for November 2007 was dirty with 38 comments.
Winner for December 2007 was Sir Henry with 84 comments.
Winner for January 2008 was goodpeople with 66 comments.
Winner for February 2008 was eM3rC with 122 comments.
Winner for March 2008 was Pantagruel with 66 comments.
Winner for April 2008 was fever with 44 comments.
Winner for May 2008 was Bogwitch with 37 comments.
Winner for June 2008 was Navin with 45 comments.


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UK Hacker Gary McKinnon to Fight Extradition

Don't let your data go over to the Dark Side!


For some of the long time readers, you might remember we’ve been covering the case of the UK Hacker Gary McKinnon for quite some time. The last post was about a year ago though in August 2007 when he Won Right to Lords Appeal Extradition Hearing.

The first post on the case was over 2 years ago in April 2006 when it was found out that British Hacker Gary McKinnon Fears Guantanamo.

Mr McKinnon, 42, first lost his case at the High Court in 2006 before taking it to the highest court in the UK, the House of Lords. He was arrested in 2002 but never charged in the UK.

The US government claims he committed a malicious crime – the biggest military computer hack ever. The authorities have warned that without his co-operation and a guilty plea the case could be treated as terrorism and he could face a long jail sentence.

Mr McKinnon, now living in north London, told BBC Radio 5 Live he was “pretty broken up” by the Law Lords’ ruling, although he had expected the outcome.

He lost the case in Lords’ by the looks of it so now he’s in pretty hot soup. It looks like if he pleads guilty he might get a lot lighter sentence and more lenient treatment.

But that’s what they always say isn’t it? Until you actually say you are guilty then they lock you up for life and throw away the key. He better be careful with whatever he’s planning, very careful indeed.

The Law Lords were told by Mr McKinnon’s lawyers that extraditing him would be an abuse of proceedings.

US authorities had threatened him with a long jail sentence if he did not plead guilty, they said.

If the case was treated as terrorism it could result in a sentence of up to 60 years in a maximum security prison, should he be found guilty on all six indictments.

With co-operation, he would receive a lesser sentence of 37 to 46 months and be repatriated to the UK, where he could be released on parole and charges of “significantly damaging national security” would be dropped.

A Home Office spokesman said Mr McKinnon would have 14 days in which to seek appeal at the European Court of Human Rights.

I don’t think it’s really a human rights case, but then it’s debatable. I think saying it’s terrorism is way out of line though, it’s a guy who did a bit of hacking on the wrong systems…he should pay for it yes, but now with 60 years in a maximum security facility in the US.

Maybe a few months in a UK prison then parole.

Source: BBC News (Thanks razta)


Posted in: General News, Legal Issues

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